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Any System Builder In Da House?

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vince

Well-Known Member
#81
Heil! Der Oberhaupt! I will post the pics as soon as i get my camera(admittedly, not too great with taking pics). That much i still owe you guys.

At the moment, i am trying to tone down the hissing noise of the CPU fan. I think it is spinning way too fast and that is why it's noise level is a bit high. Perhaps area fada can help me there. Still trying to figure out how to reduce the rpm of the fan in the BIOS because i do not want to have to buy a standalone fan controller which is an option.
Area fada, any tips?
Well done mein ubermoderator!!!

Glad to see you've recovered and finished the build. Would it be possible to post a pic of our snazzy new arrival ? And yes Vince, you sound as pleased as a new parent...:D

If you were in my neck of the woods, I would invite you down the pub for a pint to celebrate and wet the new workstation's head....:food-smil food-sm:
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#82
At the moment, i am trying to tone down the hissing noise of the CPU fan. I think it is spinning way too fast and that is why it's noise level is a bit high. Perhaps area fada can help me there. Still trying to figure out how to reduce the rpm of the fan in the BIOS because i do not want to have to buy a standalone fan controller which is an option.
Area fada, any tips?
Ah, dat one go hard o. Different fans produce noise at differing levels, so if you bought a noisy fan, it may be a tough fix if it is not intelligent enough to allow a bios fix or reduce its own speed when the PC is not hot enough to warrant full energy. You could buy a quieter fan - or reduce the number of fans, cos it sounds like you have quite a bit. The case has a fan or two? The power supply comes with a fan different from the one used by the case? The processor? The video card, right? The hard drives require cooling? And then you added a couple more? Didn't you talk about insulation sometime during this thread? That can cushion the noise in the PC. The thing is a final solution will depend on the noise cause of the specific PC, so googling the problem should reveal a load of tips. Fixing the problem itself can be an adventure, so knock yourself out. Make sure your processor is not overheating too. You installed it properly, right?
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#83
But i thought these fans can be regulated when they are hooked up to the mainboard, right? Actually, all the fans in the system are very quiet save for the cpu fan. It is proving to be the noisiest right now. A kind of loud hiss that is doing things to my ears. When i checked the BIOS, it was spinning at over 2K rpm at the moment and i think that that is too high for any fan in a normal use.

I have not added any other fan to the mix other than the ones that came with the case and the other components. The case itself came with 3 fans(1x140mm front intake fan and 2 exhausts), all whisper quiet. The PSU and the video card fans the same, utter silence. So i don't have any issues with them.

To be truthful, in one of many reviews that i read earlier, few buyers of this cpu that i am using did complain about the stock fan that came with the processor to be a bit on the loud side. Another option is to buy an after market cpu heatsink that is quieter, of course, but i don't want to get into that for now. I'd rather get a separate fan speed controller which i can use to reduce the fan speed than get a new CPU heatsink. But i'll keep checking for solutions without those two options.
Ah, dat one go hard o. Different fans produce noise at differing levels, so if you bought a noisy fan, it may be a tough fix if it is not intelligent enough to allow a bios fix or reduce its own speed when the PC is not hot enough to warrant full energy. You could buy a quieter fan - or reduce the number of fans, cos it sounds like you have quite a bit. The case has a fan or two? The power supply comes with a fan different from the one used by the case? The processor? The video card, right? The hard drives require cooling? And then you added a couple more? Didn't you talk about insulation sometime during this thread? That can cushion the noise in the PC. The thing is a final solution will depend on the noise cause of the specific PC, so googling the problem should reveal a load of tips. Fixing the problem itself can be an adventure, so knock yourself out. Make sure your processor is not overheating too. You installed it properly, right?
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#84
CPU fan? Didn't you say earlier that you didn't go with the stock option? It can be replaced as you have noted. Just restrict your search to a quieter fan compatible with the processor. I find it odd though that the Processor fan would be the culprit, considering they made them to go together...
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#85
I did say i will go with the after market option, but that option is more for gamers who overclock a lot, because the after market heatsinks are that bit more efficient in cooling the CPUs when overclocking than the stock ones. Since i am no gamer and no fan of OC, i decided to stick with the stock one.

But the truth is, many users(gamers,anyway) do complain about the high noise level of stock fans and most would rather and do go for the quieter after markets. The problem here is that i find the after markets way too bulky for my liking. They take up too much space within the case that they become obstructive during builds. That was another reason why i avoided using one.

Anyway, i'll see if i can just change the fan on the stock heatsink itself. If they can be separated, that is.
CPU fan? Didn't you say earlier that you didn't go with the stock option? It can be replaced as you have noted. Just restrict your search to a quieter fan compatible with the processor. I find it odd though that the Processor fan would be the culprit, considering they made them to go together...
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#86
But the truth is, many users(gamers,anyway) do complain about the high noise level of stock fans and most would rather and do go for the quieter after markets. The problem here is that i find the after markets way too bulky for my liking. They take up too much space within the case that they become obstructive during builds. That was another reason why i avoided using one.
You know why this should be a non-issue? Because most folks install the processor once and its done. They may reseat it years later to put more thermal grease on it, but that's about it. The processor isn't something you take off and on anyhow. Its an expensive/delicate thing that can break easily, so buy the bigger quieter fan if you have to. You don't need to go sniffing around it that much.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#87
Downloaded a fan speed control utility freeware today after having seen it used on youtube. It is called, Speedfan. One can control, as well as, monitor fan speeds and temperatures. Good utility. After installing and opening it, i found out that it has already reduced the cpu fan's rpm to below 2000, automatically making it a bit quieter. I'll stick with it for a while and see how it works on the long run.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#88
Some Updates

Hey, fellas. I have some updates to share with you on the build. If you are going to use an SSD as a boot drive on which you will be installing your OS and other applications(all modern builds should go this route, btw), expect quite a bit of your drive capacity to be eaten up by the OS installation alone.

The amount of gigs the OS installation will grab for itself will depend on the drive capacity. I had Win 7 installed on a 60 gigs capacity drive and it swallowed 25 gigs of that for itself(i wonder why that is), which got me regretting not having purchased a drive with more capacity. If i had bought one with twice that capacity, the installation would probably have swallowed twice as much. So please, take note of this and don't be surprised when it happens. It is normal occurrence.

Also, i discovered that i will be needing another 140mm intake fan to help the front intake fan with bringing in more fresh air. Already, i have one 120mm exhaust fan at the back and a 140mm one at the top. Since i have the option of installing one more fan of the same size at the top to make it 2, i will be using the new fan as an intake fan to balance up the airflow and to help cool the RAM and the CPU. One intake fan working with two exhausts does not seem like balanced airflow to me.

That's it for now. Cheers.action-s:
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#89
Cheers for that Vince.

I was just thinking, hope the PSU is comfortable with the extra fans ? It shouldn't really be a power drain, should it ?
And 25 gig for Win 7 ? That does seem excessive, but I guess Area Fada would be able to shed some light on this.
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#90
And 25 gig for Win 7 ? That does seem excessive, but I guess Area Fada would be able to shed some light on this.
Is it really unusual? Today's OSes do so much, especially when they run things like Hibernation mode which is like placing a complete duplication of your files on your disk. Maybe Sys Restore is replicating itself and filling up space? You could examine the drive closely to see what's really chewing up the space. You couldn't possibly have a virus so soon, abi?

Again, it is easy to simply buy a bigger drive and clone the boot disk to it. Switch 'em in Bios and you're good to go, without having to re-register your progs.
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#91
Is it really unusual? Today's OSes do so much, especially when they run things like Hibernation mode which is like placing a complete duplication of your files on your disk. Maybe Sys Restore is replicating itself and filling up space? You could examine the drive closely to see what's really chewing up the space. You couldn't possibly have a virus so soon, abi?

Again, it is easy to simply buy a bigger drive and clone the boot disk to it. Switch 'em in Bios and you're good to go, without having to re-register your progs.
Great points.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#92
I thought it wasn't normal before i saw a youtube video on RAM caching and the presenter mentioned this and said that it is normal. Win 7 itself does not need so much space so the extra gigs it swallows must be used for something else. Perhaps it is used for RAM Caching or something of that nature. I don't know. Anyway, i still have around 25 gigs for installing apps, so that should be more than enough room.
Is it really unusual? Today's OSes do so much, especially when they run things like Hibernation mode which is like placing a complete duplication of your files on your disk. Maybe Sys Restore is replicating itself and filling up space? You could examine the drive closely to see what's really chewing up the space. You couldn't possibly have a virus so soon, abi?

Again, it is easy to simply buy a bigger drive and clone the boot disk to it. Switch 'em in Bios and you're good to go, without having to re-register your progs.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#93
The PSU is having no problems at all, but i just saw that i did not put a filter before installing it which is not good since it has an intake fan. That is an error on my part. I can't take it out now to correct the error because it is not a fully modular PSU. The 24 pin cable and the supplement power cable along with the two graphics card power supplier are attached to it permanently.

The PSU is very power efficient and can handle even a 2 or 3 way SLI or Crossfire X with no problems at all. The extra fans shouldn't be an issue.

The 25 gigs is not completely clear to me but i have learned from these youtube videos that it is normal occurence for that to happen.
Cheers for that Vince.

I was just thinking, hope the PSU is comfortable with the extra fans ? It shouldn't really be a power drain, should it ?
And 25 gig for Win 7 ? That does seem excessive, but I guess Area Fada would be able to shed some light on this.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#94
A question to area fada. Do you use this RAM Cache or the RAMdisk technology to improve performance on your system? There is a lot of talk about that technology on the net, especially since the latest Intel motherboards support it.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#95
The Systembuilder Superstition Got Me Twice

You guys should be familiar with the systembuilder superstition that forbids anybody building their system never to close the chassis up until the system has successfully booted for the first time.

Well, i have gone past that stage since i successfully booted the system about a few weeks back now. So, there i was, yesterday and today, trying to install just an ordinary cardreader o! Cardreader and nothing more. The system booted but will not post when i switched in on after having closed the side panels. As a matter of fact, the monitor showed me the "no signal" notice.

After wrangling with the PC for a while, it finally booted and everything was back to normal but the card reader installation did not work because the adapter for the card reader was wrong for it in that it cannot be screwed down so i had to remove it and install a 5.25" card reader that needs no adapter this morning. Well, this same thing happened again today. The PC wouldn't boot despite the fact that i did not close the panel.

I later found out that one should not also do before starting up one's PC, never plug in the peripherals before booting. Something that i did today. So, just in case you are wondering, the system builder superstition actually does work. It is true.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#96
Area fada no kuku answer dis my kweshion. E be like sey you are not familiar with this technology. But as a content creator, you should know of it, asap.
A question to area fada. Do you use this RAM Cache or the RAMdisk technology to improve performance on your system? There is a lot of talk about that technology on the net, especially since the latest Intel motherboards support it.
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#97
Area fada no kuku answer dis my kweshion. E be like sey you are not familiar with this technology. But as a content creator, you should know of it, asap.
No, not familiar with its usage, although that's easy to fix. My current Desktop I purchased in one quick visit to Best Buy. My previous one died on me so suddenly in November last year, right in the middle of a deadlined major edit. I had no time to be investigating the latest gear to assemble something. I'm okay with this for now. My laptop complements it. When I have a little change, I can splurge on the latest and greatest.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#98
You can actually use RAM cache or RAM disk on any PC just as long as you have enough RAM. You just need RAM utility like Archicrypt to set it up. You don't need a brand new computer for it. I am about to try the SSD caching by marrying my 2 TB HDD with a 64 GB OCZ Synapse SSD, with the SSD acting as the caching drive. It is supposed to speed up the hard drive to improve it's performance during editing.

RAM disk is supposed to be way faster than SSD caching but 16 GB at the minimum or better still, twice that, is needed in which a part of the RAM capacity is used as a drive to store data of all kinds when working on projects.
No, not familiar with its usage, although that's easy to fix. My current Desktop I purchased in one quick visit to Best Buy. My previous one died on me so suddenly in November last year, right in the middle of a deadlined major edit. I had no time to be investigating the latest gear to assemble something. I'm okay with this for now. My laptop complements it. When I have a little change, I can splurge on the latest and greatest.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#99
In the PC market right now, 3 companies are offering caching technology to help speed up and improve PC performance; Intel with their SRT(smart response technology), Asus with their SSD caching technology and OCZ with their SSD product line "Synapse" in conjunction with the Dataplex caching software. They are all limited in some way, for example, Intel's caching method will only work with one mainboard chipset (Z68 Intel motherboard)and is limited to a maximum SSD capacity of 60GB. But it will use any SSD from any company.

The Asus variation is also chip set dependent(X79 chipset), but it has no capacity limit and very easy to set up by using their own proprietary caching utility. ASUS X79 - SSD Caching - YouTube

The OCZ variation, which i am going to implement, is chipset independent and can be implemented on any motherboard, but is tied to a second party caching utility, Dataplex, and to a particular brand of OCZ SSD product, Synapse. OCZ Synapse SSD Caching
 

vince

Well-Known Member
Need to put down a note on all these SSD caching technology. If you intend to use it to boost the performance of your hard drives, you will need to take not of one important thing and that is that ONLY the boot drives can be used for SSD caching. Meaning that only the drives with operating system installed on it can work with the technology.

I found that out as i was planning to use the OCZ synapse variation as an alternative to raid 0 configuration option on my media drive with no OS installed on it, just media. Since i already installed windows 7 on an SSD, this variation(or any other for that matter) ain't gonna work because of the reason i stated above and i really don't need it, tbh.

The only other variation that can and does work on it's own as a performance boosted media HDD storage is the momentus XT hybrid option from Seagate that comes with 8 GB flash capacity already in it. This can be used as a pepped up HDD media drive on it's own, and due to it's form factor (2.5") will fit into any video editing lappie for extra storage.
 
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