Big Man - Short Film By Julius Onah

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Kala Lou

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#4
These boys are unbelievable. Best child performances i have seen in any Naija film. Almost as if there was no camera in front of them.
You're right, the short feels so real..almost like you're watching a documentary, very unpretentious. I wonder what it took for the director to get that level of performance from the kids. BTW the director is about to make a splash in Hollywood, check out this article on Julius Onah .
Code:
http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/watch-julius-onahs-moving-focus-features-africa-first-short-film-big-man
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#5
You're right, the short feels so real..almost like you're watching a documentary, very unpretentious. I wonder what it took for the director to get that level of performance from the kids. BTW the director is about to make a splash in Hollywood, check out this article on Julius Onah .
Code:
http://blogs.indiewire.com/shadowandact/watch-julius-onahs-moving-focus-features-africa-first-short-film-big-man


Great!
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#6
I see credit for music at the end but can't hear one single piece of music through out, not even a note. Just practical sounds, ambience, foley etc. Just wondering. Though i'm not sure music would have helped the film in anyway. It feels better just the way it is, almost as if you were spying through some sophisticated camera at this regular Nigerian family and the turmoils of raising two (or is it one, lol) adventurous boys.
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#7
Just found out via Julius's imdb page that he is the twin brother of Anthony Onah, also a filmmaker (Da Raju which won the Afrinolly contest last year), another brilliant filmmaker. So much talent in one family.
 

Kala Lou

Well-Known Member
#8
I see credit for music at the end but can't hear one single piece of music through out, not even a note. Just practical sounds, ambience, foley etc. Just wondering. Though i'm not sure music would have helped the film in anyway. It feels better just the way it is, almost as if you were spying through some sophisticated camera at this regular Nigerian family and the turmoils of raising two (or is it one, lol) adventurous boys.
Didn't even notice there was no music till you mentioned it, got so caught up in the story and performances. I guess having no music helps to give it that strip down, documentary style look. A scene that stuck out to me was after the dad steals a piece of dodo from the son, the look of disapproval from the mum to the dad, just before she scolds the son, just did it for me....so brief...so subtle but I keep replaying it in my head, without saying a word that look spoke volumes.
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#9
Didn't even notice there was no music till you mentioned it, got so caught up in the story and performances. I guess having no music helps to give it that strip down, documentary style look. A scene that stuck out to me was after the dad steals a piece of dodo from the son, the look of disapproval from the mum to the dad, just before she scolds the son, just did it for me....so brief...so subtle but I keep replaying it in my head, without saying a word that look spoke volumes.


My best part was where Ozoma goes to his dad who is lost in thought and asks if his brother would be okay and then hands over the cane afterwards. I could relate to that so much and i just don't get it, how did they pull these kids off? Brilliant is an understatement.
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#10
Just the other day i was complaining about how Yoruba movies need to learn to write their kid dialogues appropriately and not try to make it so over-dramatic by giving them words that only people at a certain age use. There are better/subtle ways of showing a child isn't happy with his/her dad than having that child say something like 'daddy, you are the reason for my sadness. Is it because mummy is dead, you are now sleeping/dating that Aunty' ? (from a yoruba movie i tried watching. Turned off after that scene)

I don't know, that just rubbed me off completely, like whose kid talks like that? Not even the little girl in real life. So it was a huge relief to watch these kids talk and act like kids i know, especially in Nigeria. I know kids in yankee are more vocal and that has to do with the free upbringing and all, unlike Naija where you aren't allowed to talk in certain places as a kid, it is considered being rude.
 
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