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CNN.com: What's Next for Nollywood?

Discussion in 'FILMMAKING, INDUSTRY, TECHNOLOGY' started by rudeboy, Nov 17, 2010.

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  1. rudeboy

    rudeboy Well-Known Member

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    Obi Emelonye (director, "The Mirror Boy"), Wale Ojo (founder, New Nigeria Cinema) and Omelihu Nwanguma (director "Area Boys") were on CNN last week discussing Nollywood.

    CNN.com - What's next for Nollywood?
     
  2. Field Marshal

    Field Marshal ABSOLUTE SUPREME RULER

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    Wonderful interview.
     
  3. ssergit

    ssergit ..still The Drama Queen!

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    very soon, being on CNN would not be a big thing for Nigerians! lolol
     
  4. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    I don't think these three guys represent "what's next for Nollywood."

    For one thing, none of them actually lives or works in Nigeria, for the most part and all their focus seems to be getting Nigerian movies to compete in European film festivals, which is diametrically opposite to what Nollywood is about or ever really aspired to be.
     
  5. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    So in all honesty, who would you rather see there?
     
  6. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    So in all honesty, who would you rather see there?
     
  7. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    No idea.

    I think these guys DO deserve to have a story about them... It's just misleading to suggest that they are representing "Nollywood" when they are in fact working outside of Nollywood and to some degree, against to it. What they are doing is more akin to the French Nouvelle Vague perhaps, or the old pre-1990s American independent scene. It's a counter-current to Nollywood, not the future of it.

    But who or what is the future of Nollywood itself? *shrug* Beats me!
     
  8. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    So maybe they shouldnt have called it the future of nollywood. They should have just termed it "the birth of the new nigerian cinema" or something like that. Nollywood in its real form would always remain the same so dont even beat your head about its future, except of course the latest trend of semi-nudity in the videos is what the future entails....
     
  9. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    Oh, I think Nollywood will evolve... It's already been evolving constantly throughout its existence. It's just that the change is gradual and organic rather than radical. If you watch a movie from 2000 and compare it to the stuff today you can see that things have really evolved.
     
  10. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    Well it wasnt the same way as it was from 10 years ago, agreed but nollywood in itself these days seems to have fallen, and there isnt any real content any more. Except for these new guys making movies for the big screen and a very few from nollywood itself.
     
  11. wendydoks

    wendydoks Chickala si odeshi

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    i believe the guys represent nollywood. they dont necessARRILY work outside naija, esp when dey r using nigerian actors. to represent nollywood, u dont HAVE to be IN nigeria. mirror boy is a nollywood movie. areaboys is a nollywood movie so they represent nollywood.
     
  12. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    Any industry has its peaks and valleys... There might be low periods, but it eventually bounces back again.

    The main thing that Nollywood has going for it (that these Nigerian "independent" filmmakers don't have) is its constellation of stars.

    As much as people like to front and claim that they are motivated to see movies primarily by the content/story, most people who say this are lying to themselves... They like stars. And there remains a strong interest in these stars as personalities both on and off the screen. As long as this interest exists, Nollywood will continue to sell movies.
     
  13. wendydoks

    wendydoks Chickala si odeshi

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    nollywood needs pplle like u to constantly prove wrong. the only prob is, you guys stay amnestic regardless. i have been watchin nollywood since its birth. annd i am tlkin abt the real nollywood. and there has been lots of changes. pple like u will never see any changes even if it hits u in the face.
     
  14. wendydoks

    wendydoks Chickala si odeshi

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    and wat do u mean by "nigerian independent filmakers"? cos pretty much every filmaker is independent in naija. there is no differnce and you are just trying to create an unnecessary one.
     
  15. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    That's the reason I put "independent filmmakers" in quotes.

    Yes, every filmmaker in Nigeria is "independent" financially as we don't have anything approaching an organized studio structure.

    But what makes these fellows "independent" in the sense in which I'm using the word is that they are independent ideologically, aesthetically and to some degree, even economically as they are not pursuing the traditional markets that are Nollywood's bread and butter.

    Are you seriously arguing that there is no difference between the average Nollywood producer and this Nwaguma guy who shot a social conscience-driven movie (which borders on didacticism) with no stars, didn't release it into the VCD market and instead is more concerned about how it performs in European film festivals (which will not in any way recoup his investment)? You're saying you can look at him and say that he is working on the same level as someone like Chico Ejiro?
     
  16. rudeboy

    rudeboy Well-Known Member

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    Take, I respect your thoughts, but to let you know: (I do not know Wale Ojo nor Omelihu Nwanguma, but) Obi Emelonye at a point did live and worked in nollywood for years. He lived in Saki Crescent (near 13 Fatman) where he made at least 6 Nollywood films with most of the top names you hear today. Also, he lived in Nigeria before going to the UK. His films are made with Nollywood cast and crew members. I am not holding brief for him, but it's just for the records sha.
     
  17. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    He lived in Nigeria "at one point" or does he live there NOW?

    I'm not talking about their histories... I'm dealing with the current reality.
     
  18. wendydoks

    wendydoks Chickala si odeshi

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    i see where u r goin @. however, they r still part of nollywood esp if dey r recognizing them selves as part of nollywood practitioners and calling their works Nollywood product. Nollywood musnt always be abt "home videos". @least what we r seeing now is a new type of nollywood emerging right before our eyes. before now, we didnt see movies being played in theatres before being released to vcds. its that word we constantly fail to recognize: evolving.


    and pls, define wat u mean by "traditional market" cos last time i checked, nollywood expanded and made certain changes to reach audience beyond nigeria, and africa. the same formula is still being used here.
     
  19. wendydoks

    wendydoks Chickala si odeshi

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    may i also remind u dt movies like "cindy's note", "nnenda" etc are social conscious driven movies that just happened to go straight into vcds. every producer/director has an ulterior motive. they want their work to be recognized some how be it economically or honourably like being played in an international film festivals. which will get them alot of recognition. so it is still the same bread and butter osuofia in london is eating from. i am sorry, but i see no sense in segregating these practitioners. They themselves dont even want to be put in a different bracket of Nollywood practitioners.
     
  20. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    They are Nigerian filmmakers, but they are not part of Nollywood.

    I've long noticed that people have a habit of confusing the two... Like calling people like Chiwetel Ejiofor and David Owolowo "Nollywood actors." No, they are Nigerian actors (or actors of Nigerian heritage) but they don't live or work in Nigeria, and they are not part of the local Nigerian film industry any more than someone like Sade Adu is part of the Nigerian music scene.

    "Nollywood" primarily refers to the local industry revolving around home videos. Sure, of late the industry has been expanding into theatrical exhibition (see, moviewizard? evolution IS happening!) but the primary mode of distribution is still VCD.

    But even beyond the means of distribution, I think one of the defining features of Nollywood is that it is primarily a commerce-driven industry while what these "independents" are doing seems to be more art-driven to a degree. Nwanguma in particular puts a lot of emphasis on the message of his work where Nollywood would typically put the focus on entertainment value.

    I mean, I haven't seen The Mirror Boy so I don't know what the tone of that piece is... Emelonye at least uses a few star actors associated with the Nollywood mainstream, so I would probably be more inclined to consider his work as being an organic outgrowth of Nollywood.

    Still, the heavy concern with getting into film festivals in particular just sounds anti-Nollywood to me. That is virtually the opposite of everything that Nollywood has defined itself as up to this point.
     
    Angela81 likes this.
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