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Contemplating Going Natural?

#42
With twists, they use a comb to twist it, then hold it with a special gel. If water touches it it all goes to shyte....you need to redo it evry two weeks. After a while, if your haor g4ows longer, then the twists becomes locks and there is no need for the gel, then ya get locks. Sho get?
Plus if you want to change you can take your twists down, dreads not so much.
 

blackpearl

Well-Known Member
#44
Okay got this from FB but this might be helpful to some of yall.
I opened my hair yesterday night and they are sooooooooo long already!!!
Am soooooo happy about that...infact if am in a better mood I might just post a pic!!

Communities:
Naturally Sexy :: Natural Black Hair Information, Inspiration & Indulgence
http://www.cnappymenow.com
Curly Hair Products and Advice for Natural black-ethnic-biracial curls care
Happy Curls
K.I.N.K.Y Keep It Natural Know Yourself
http://nappyme.wordpress.com/-
TYTECURL- Natural Hair - Dont Worry Be Nappy
OurHair Black Hair Care African American Styles Braids Twists Locs
Foundationz - Afro Hair Care With a Natural Twist
Nappturality:African-American, Black Natural Hair Care - Love Your Natural Hair
Natural Black Hair Care
Natural Hair Digest | Nappy since nappy was!
Home - MotownGirl.com :: Do It Yourself Natural Haircare
mynappykitchen.com
???????????????????????????????????
Naturallycurly.com: Where curls come to life!
Pebbles Page
BlackRefer.com - A Comprehensive Listing of Black Websites
Naturally You! Magazine // The Natural Hair Care & Lifestyle Magazine - Black Natural Hair Care // Afros // Locs // Styles // Photos // Salons
http://www.longhaircareforum.com/home.php
Going Natural: Black Natural Hair Care Magazine - Love your Nappy Hair - Home
Black Hair Media Hair Forum


Blogs:
AfroNiquely You
Crown of Glory » HOME
black girl with long hair
Mane & Chic
Posts from the Hair Apparent Black Hair Care Category at Black Voices Blogs
Welcome
NappyNest
http://www.scandalousbeautyonline.com
..::Ghettointellect.com::..
Afrobella | Beauty, fashion, music and more
Nappily Evah Aftah
~ Celebrate New Growth ~ Roshini's African American Black Natural Hair Care How-to and Journal ~
Naturally You! Magazine: Behind the Naps!

Stores w/additional info (blogs,advice,etc.):
Goddess Zuri | Declare Your Natural Beauty
EDEN BodyWorks - we integrate wellness and beauty into our products to restore and maintain your body's original design
Grow Afro Hair Long--Official Site
T'Keyah.com Motto: "Where Crystal Visions Come To Life..

Stores:
ETAE TEST
Scalp Treatment Clinic
MYHoneyChild Natural Hair Products - Home
Miss Jessie's
Be Urself Clothing Apparel®
https://shearadiance.com/?q=home
Kakakiki KombBrush
aveda - official site - shop online or find a salon
African Fixed Oils
Your Page Title
Natural Hair, Black Hair Care, Black Hair Style, Hair Growth, Black Skin Care, African American Hair, Shea Butter, Tips
Carol's Daughter - Personal and Beauty Care Items Inspired by Nature and Produced With Love
Welcome to Urbanbella
Foundationz - Afro Hair Care With a Natural Twist
Shea Butter: Fair Trade, Unrefined Shea Butter and African Black Soap
Natural hair care products for Curly hair - biracial hair, black hair , Ethnic hair, African American hair, African hair, kinky hair, mixed hair by Blended Beauty
Soap making, spa, skin care, massage, aromatherapy and cosmeceutical ingredient supplier - FromNatureWithLove.com Natural & Vegetable Oils & Waxes, Essential Oils, Vegetable Butters, Plant Waxes
oyin: handmade hair & body stuff
http://www.anitagrant.com
Welcome to Sistas Place! - Natural skin and hair care products
Naturally Naani - Natural, Organic Hair Products, Pictures & Information
Curly hair products | Curly hair care
Your Page Title
Jason Natural Personal Care Products
Braids, Weaves & Things
Henna Sooq

Salons/Hairstylists with Picture Galleries & other info :
http://www.abstractsalonofthearts.com/
Welcome to Urbanbella
http://www.gettwisted.org
Thierry Baptiste
Diane Da Costa.com
Changes Salon Spa and Wellness Center::: detection flash plugin
//afrodisiac//
http://www.khamitkinks.com/home.html
Hair Services for Ethnic Hair including Hair Coloring - Brooklyn, New York

Other ( dont know what to call these sites since they have different stuff..lol):
http://www.sisterlocks.com
Hair Affairs
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#46
Thanks for reviving this thread Bolanle!

Check out my facebook profile pic - my hair is finally finally grown.....I washed, blowed dried and flat ironed it on Saturday, and it felt so good, so healthy...ah...the possibilities!!!!

I'm excited :)
 

Aust_nne

Well-Known Member
#47
I've been natural for over a year now and am beginning to love me hair...ever since I could get it into a bun to fit my work hardhat, its been good...I have no regrets..


Yea Abike, your hair looks good...damn. I'd take some photos this weekend to showcase my naturalle hair. :P
 

blackpearl

Well-Known Member
#48
Thanks for reviving this thread Bolanle!

Check out my facebook profile pic - my hair is finally finally grown.....I washed, blowed dried and flat ironed it on Saturday, and it felt so good, so healthy...ah...the possibilities!!!!

I'm excited :)
Yeah they really look beautiful and HEALTHY.
How many times do you trim your ends?
I am still quite afraid of flat ironing my hair, I have very sensetive hair and flat ironing would actually bring more damage to it.

I think I need to do another Olive oil wrap-up
 

blackpearl

Well-Known Member
#49
I've been natural for over a year now and am beginning to love me hair...ever since I could get it into a bun to fit my work hardhat, its been good...I have no regrets..


Yea Abike, your hair looks good...damn. I'd take some photos this weekend to showcase my naturalle hair. :P
Yay!!! More pics corkysm60:
 

Aust_nne

Well-Known Member
#50
Yeah they really look beautiful and HEALTHY.
How many times do you trim your ends?
I am still quite afraid of flat ironing my hair, I have very sensetive hair and flat ironing would actually bring more damage to it.

I think I need to do another Olive oil wrap-up
Whats olive oil wrap?

am still learning about my hear.
 

blackpearl

Well-Known Member
#51
Ohhh I saw one cute style but it is work...probably I might just do that this evening.
It really looks beautiful and it is such a nice summer style.
Does anybody konw any site whereby someone can see nice Afrostyle...not too complicated. I want to rock my Afro just a tiny little bit, before braiding it again!!
 

blackpearl

Well-Known Member
#52
Whats olive oil wrap?

am still learning about my hear.
Olive oil wrap is quite easy. You take some olive oil and on your natural hair and leave it in over the night. It softens your hair, makes it shine more and is totally healthy. I call it my natural conditioner. Am telling you when you wash the oil out, your hair will be as soft as a baby bum. Well that depends on how strong or soft your hair naturally is.
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#53
Thanks dear! Yes, please post pics for us o! we wan see....

I might go back to braids relatively soon, ONLY because I dey enter gym a lot ya know...but we'll see!

I've been natural for over a year now and am beginning to love me hair...ever since I could get it into a bun to fit my work hardhat, its been good...I have no regrets..


Yea Abike, your hair looks good...damn. I'd take some photos this weekend to showcase my naturalle hair. :P
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#54
Lets see, I got a trim on Saturday, and before that a few months ago...waited longer than I would have liked to....


Yeah they really look beautiful and HEALTHY.
How many times do you trim your ends?
I am still quite afraid of flat ironing my hair, I have very sensetive hair and flat ironing would actually bring more damage to it.

I think I need to do another Olive oil wrap-up
 

Aust_nne

Well-Known Member
#55
Olive oil wrap is quite easy. You take some olive oil and on your natural hair and leave it in over the night. It softens your hair, makes it shine more and is totally healthy. I call it my natural conditioner. Am telling you when you wash the oil out, your hair will be as soft as a baby bum. Well that depends on how strong or soft your hair naturally is.

oh cool...I'd try that. Thanks Bolanle. :)
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#56
Will be on the lookout for it....will post it here if I find it...I too need ideas...


Ohhh I saw one cute style but it is work...probably I might just do that this evening.
It really looks beautiful and it is such a nice summer style.
Does anybody konw any site whereby someone can see nice Afrostyle...not too complicated. I want to rock my Afro just a tiny little bit, before braiding it again!!
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#57
Oh really?

Thanks! grinning: Will try this TONIGHT!!!


Olive oil wrap is quite easy. You take some olive oil and on your natural hair and leave it in over the night. It softens your hair, makes it shine more and is totally healthy. I call it my natural conditioner. Am telling you when you wash the oil out, your hair will be as soft as a baby bum. Well that depends on how strong or soft your hair naturally is.
 

blackpearl

Well-Known Member
#58
Lets see, I got a trim on Saturday, and before that a few months ago...waited longer than I would have liked to....
I always trim mine when I open my hair. A friend of mine that is so totally into all this afro things told me that trimming the ends is quite important since it could be the cause of your hair not growing fast enough. You know some people just keep the split ends because it makes their hair longer.
 

blackpearl

Well-Known Member
#60
Don't konw if I have posted this in here before but it DID help me a lot....

Our Hair

Our hair is naturally dry, because the oils (sebum) produced in the scalp cannot travel down the hair shaft like it does on straight, silky hair. This is why Caucasians’ and Asians’ hair becomes greasy when it’s dirty, because the sebum has a much better chance to travel down the hair shaft to lubricate the hair. For this reason, they can also get away with using drying sprays and other styling products.

Kinky hair has many “bends” which makes it the most fragile of all hair types (contrary to popular belief). Every bend is a breaking point. For this is reason, it is extremely important to handle our hair with extreme care.

* Never comb the hair dry, no matter how soft you think your hair is! You can always spritz the hair with a self-made moisturising spray and then comb with a wide tooth comb.
* Never brush the hair when wet!!!!! Your hair is at its weakest when wet, and brushing will only weaken it further!
* Avoid wearing woolly hats. Your hair will get caught up and will break.
* Sleep with a satin scarf or on a satin pillow case.
* Always make sure you hair is well moisturised. This will ensure that you to retain length and prevent breaking.
* Do a protein treatment every once in a while (or more often if your hair is permanently dyed) (more about this below)
* Avoid hair products that clog your hair. They will only coat your hair and make it hard (more on this below)


Useful link:
Home - MotownGirl.com :: Do It Yourself Natural Haircare (excellent advice for starting out with natural hair; excellent recipes for home-made products; excellent advice on general hair care)





Product Ingredients
Product ingredients are always listed in order on the ingredients list, i.e. the first ingredient on the label of the product will be the main ingredient, whilst the last ingredient on the list will be the least in the product.


Shampoos

The main ingredients in any shampoo will be water (aqua) and one or more of the following foaming agents (surfactants):

* Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (very harsh and very stripping to the hair)
* Sodium Laureth Sulphate (milder, but stripping to the hair)
* Ammonium Lauryl Sulphate (harsh and strips the hair)
* Ammonium Laureth Sulphate (milder, but can strip the hair)
* Cocobetaine (very mild)
* Cocamidopropyl Betaine (very mild)
* Sodium Myreth Sulphate (Sodium Myristil Ether Sulphate) (milder, but can strip the hair)
* Sodium Pareth Sulphate (not as common as the other sulphates) (milder)



For our type of hair (from curly to very kinky) it’s best to opt for shampoos that are very mild, i.e. shampoos without sulphate but cocobetaine or cocamidopropyl betaine (e.g. Be Naked Hydrating Shampoo with honey, available from larger Boots stores, approx. £4.99). Alternatively, you could use a shampoo bar (https://anitagrant.com).

Never get sucked into what a shampoo says on the pack (e.g. “moisturising”, “voluminising”, “nourishing”, etc.), but always look the ingredients label, because that is what really tells you the truth. For example Aussie Miracle Moist shampoo is advertised as a moisturising shampoo, however the main ingredients are Sodium Lauryl Sulphate and Sodium Laureth Sulphate and Cocamidopropyl Betaine. The combination of these three foaming agents strips the hair of it’s natural oils and makes it very dry and tangled.


Shampoo Bars
Natural Shampoo bars normally have no detergents at all, but have oils (olive oil, babassu oil, etc.) that have been saponified. This makes them extremely mild to use on the hair and very moisturising. You can also find some liquid shampoos that have oils which have been saponified too. The only problem is that they can build up on the hair, and you may need to clarify once in a while.


Clarifying

Products can build up on the hair, making it limp, dull and difficult to retain moisture. If your hair feels overly greasy (due to oily products) or hard or simply has a lot of lint, it may be time to clarify. Clarifying shampoos are normally clear in colour and contain little to no moisturising agents. When clarifying, always follow up with a moisturising shampoo!
Good clarifying shampoo: Keracare 1st Lather.


Conditioners


Conditioner Ingredients:
Every conditioner will have water and one or more of the following fatty acids as main ingredient: Stearyl Alcohol, Cetyl Alcohol or Cetearyl Alcohol. These acids act as thickeners and emulsifiers in conditioners.


Most Conditioners also contain smoothing agents in the form of silicones (or “cones”). These are meant to coat the hair shaft, and make it smooth and glossy. Silicones “fool” the hair into believing that it is being moisturised, however if you fail to clarify your hair regularly, they can build up on your hair, making it limp, lifeless, dull and hard.
Silicones are not bad ingredients, but since they coat the hair shaft, they can make it difficult for moisturising agents to penetrate the hair. When using products with silicones, it is important to keep in mind what type of silicone is in your product, as well as how easy it is to wash it out. Also, when using products with silicones, you must clarify once in a while.


Types of silicones:
There are water-soluble and non-water-soluble silicones. Water-soluble silicones can easily be washed off the hair with water and/or conditioner. Non-water soluble silicones will need a detergent in order to be removed from the hair. You will always recognise a silicone in an ingredient list if it has a “cone” attached at the end of the word (with exceptions, of course).

Water-soluble Cones:

* Any silicone that has a “PEG-#” attached before the cone, e.g. PEG-12 Dimethicone.
* Amodimethicone + Trideth-12 (somewhere low in the ingredient list)
* Dimethicone Copolyol


Most common Non-Water-Soluble Cones:

* Amodimethicone (on its own, but this hardly occurs)
* Dimethicone (requires only mild surfactant like Cocobetaine)
* Simethicone (requires harsher surfactant)
* Cyclomethicone (requires harsher surfactant)
* Cyclopentasiloxane (requires very harsh surfactant as it is so stubborn)
* Phenyl Trimethicone
* Dimethiconol

You will find silicones in some shampoos, most conditioners, most styling products and all serums.




Types of Conditioners

Conditioners will also have moisturising agents, such as Panthenol, oils, or humectants (more on these below), as well as detangling agents such as Behentrimonium Chloride or Cetrimonium Chloride.



The main purpose of conditioners is to put back the moisture that has been stripped off the hair by the shampooing process.

There are many types of conditioners on the market, but these are the ones you will find the most:

* Remoisturising Conditioners or Conditioner Rinses (also called “daily conditioners” or “conditioners for frequent use”)
* Deep Conditioners (also “Conditioning Treatments” or “Deep Treatments”)
* Protein Conditioners
* Reconstructors
* Leave-in Conditioners



Remoisturising Conditioners:
Conditioner Rinses are your every-day-conditioners. Any conditioner that says “rinse out after 1 or 2 minutes” or “apply and rinse” is a remoisturiser. They don’t penetrate the hair shaft like a deep conditioner would, but merely coat the surface of the hair and smoothen the shaft. They are normally inexpensive, but quite effective as moisturisers.

Examples:

Aussie Moist conditioner (my favourite) as well as other Aussie conditioners in the bottle
Any L’Oreal Conditioner in a bottle
Any Tresémme Conditioner in the bottle
Any Pantene conditioner in the bottle



Deep Conditioners or Deep Treatments:
A good deep conditioner will always penetrate the hair shaft. Any conditioner that requires being left on for more than 5 minutes can be classified as a deep treatment. You cannot use your everyday conditioner as deep treatment just by leaving it on longer. It will not do anything for your hair but simply moisturise.
Good deep conditioners tend to be a bit more pricy, but you would only use them about twice a month or so if your hair is in good condition.

Examples:
Joico Moisture Recovery Treatment Balm (my absolute favourite )
Redken All soft treatment
Redken Butter Treat
Pantene Relaxed & Natural Breakage Defense Hair Mask (my second favourite )


Protein Conditioners:
Protein conditioners are repairing conditioners which can help in repairing or preventing hair breakage, brittleness, etc. They can also be quite strengthening for the hair. Any conditioner that says “repairing”, “fortifying”, “strengthening”, “for damaged hair”, “for brittle hair” will contain proteins.
Protein conditioners are often mistaken for “reconstructors” which are treatments very damaged hair. Also, some protein conditioners are “misnamed” reconstructors, when they simply conditioners that contain proteins.

Types of Protein:
Collagen Proteins (commonly Hydrolysed Collagen)-- known for increasing elasticity in the hair.

Silk Proteins -- known for softening the hair.
Wheat Proteins -- a moisturising and strengthening protein. Known for increasing the hair's ability to maintain & receive moisture.

Keratin Protein -- responsible for keeping the hair strong and pliable. This is the strongest of the (hair product) proteins and is actually the one hair is made from. This one re-structures hair that has been damaged or broken down by chemicals. It helps to replace the amino acid cysteine which is the main one lost during chemical processing. This is the heavy duty protein. If you see the following as an ingredient:

*a) Keratin protein -- the will re-structure and strengthen the hair cuticle (the outer layer only & the most important layer)

*b) Hydrolyzed Keratin Protein of Keratin Amino Acids -- this means that the Keratin molecules have been broken down and are small enough to go beyond the cuticle and penetrate the hair shaft. It will strengthen all 3 layers of the hair. That is why the term "deep conditioning" technically only refers to this kind of treatment using penetrating proteins.

*c) Hydrolyzed Human Hair Keratin -- This is an exact match for the keratin your hair has (or has lost due to chemical processing). This is the highest quality and most potent keratin that can be used in hair products.

*Vegetable protein -- Vegetable protein absorbs more easily into the hair shaft (than animal protein) and does not create build-up, leaves the hair very shiny, radiant, luxuriant, and healthy.

*Animal protein -- Animal protein breaks down into fatty acids, which coats the hair and create residual build-up.

Silk Amino Acids/Protein -- Natural Silk is the strongest, natural fiber known to mankind. Discovered in Japan and has been used for centuries in all kinds of products that require durability. Silk has a tiny molecule that can penetrate the entire hair shaft deeper than all other proteins without adding any weight leaving the hair feeling clean and non-greasy.


Examples:

* Aussie Reconstructor
* Aphogee 2 Minute Keratin Treatment
* Nexxus Keraphix (you may need a moisturising conditioner afterwards)
* Joico Reconstructor (you may need a moisturising conditioner afterwards)
* Joico Intensive Moisture Treatment
* Aveda Damage Remedy Intensive Restructuring Treatment




Reconstructors
Reconstructors are strong protein treatments, and there are not many real reconstructors out there. They penetrate the hair shaft and have the ability to temporarily rebuild the hair. It is always important to follow up with a deep conditioner, because all that protein can leave your hair hard and brittle. This same rule also applies to some protein conditioners which are normally milder, but depending on hair’s sensitivity to protein can still leave your hair hard.

Generally, if your hair is in good condition, you will find that you may never need a reconstructor. If you have extensive damage to your hair (through bleaching, relaxing and/or dying as well as applying straightening or curling tools too often) you may find reconstructors very helpful.

Examples:

* Aphogee Protein Treatment for damaged hair (the smelly one)
* Nexxus Emergencee




Leave-in Conditioners
Leave-in conditioners are, as the name implies, conditioners that are supposed to be left in. They form a general protective barrier against further styling like blowdrying, but also enable to retain moisture. You don’t have to use a leave-in, in my opinion. But you can use a good leave-in as a daily moisturiser, if you find that other moisturisers are too heavy for your hair.

Examples:

* Giovanni Direct Leave-in
* Aveda Elixir (discontinued)


Styling Products
Ingredients to look out for:
Mineral Oil (or Paraffinum Liquidum) – found in most products marketed towards afro hair like Pink Oil, Dark & Lovely or Motions moisturisers, and is usually the first or second ingredient. Mineral Oil is used widely (in many hair products but also in most skin care products, as well as Johnsons Baby Oil, which is 100% mineral oil) because it is cheap and easy to get. Mineral Oil does not moisturise, but coats and remains on the surface until “wiped off”. This is why you find that when using products like Oil Moisturisers, your hair is overly greasy, but still stiff and hard. You will also find that baby oil does not moisturise at all!!


Petrolatum (or Petroleum Jelly Parrafin or simply Vaseline) is a lubricant and also widely used in hair and skin care products as well as cosmetics. Petrolatum, contrary to what some websites will tell you, does nothing to moisturise but simply coats the hair and can clog pores. On the skin (especially if you have exzema breakouts), you may find petrolatum (mixed with other ingredients like silicones) quite soothing (from personal experience). All “greases” for afro hair contain Petrolatum as main ingredient, e.g. Blue Magic, Dax, Ultra Sheen, etc.


Alcohols/Solvents
Most sprays and many gels (especially the ones you will find in local chemists and drug stores) will contain drying alcohols (not to be mistaken for the fatty acids found in conditioners and moisturisers).
Alcohols are disastrous to our type of hair because they are drying and make the hair hard and brittle. It is always best to avoid products that contain these:

* Isopropyl Alcohol
* Alcohol denat. (=denatured alcohol, also listed as SD alcohol)




Moisturisers
Moisturisers (as opposed to oils and/or some butters) are designed to do just that – moisturise. They will always be water-based or have water as a second ingredient. They come in forms of creams, lotions or liquids.
For your type of hair, I suggest spray moisturisers

A good moisturiser for our type of hair will not clog the hair, will penetrate the hair shaft rather than coat it and will moisturise all day.

You will also find that most moisturisers contain detangling agents as well as silicones. You just have to try and see what works for you.


Gels

Believe it or not, but I found that the best gels are found in afro-shops, because they tend not to be as drying or hardening (except brown gels). If you are into gels, I suggest you buy IC Fantasia Gel with Sparkelites (the blue one in the tub).



Oils

We have been led to believe that oils moisturise the hair. The truth is that oils on their own cannot moisturise the hair, but when coupled with a moisturiser or even just water, they can seal in the moisture. E.g. if you use a water-based moisturiser and mix it with some oil, it can be very effective in sealing in the moisture. You will also find that not all oils suit everyone. You will need to experiment and see what works for you. You could also add some oil to your shampoo (on your hand) which could prevent stripping.

Note: Oil sheens are the one of the worst things you can put on your hair, especially when used on their own. Most oil sheens available in beauty supply stores contain mineral oil and some for of alcohol or gas (as it’s a spray can). For sheen, try to mix a little bit of your favourite oil with your moisturiser.


Preservatives

All hair and skin care products as well as cosmetics available commercially will contain one or more preservatives.

The most common ones normally have a “paraben” attached at the end of the word:

* Methylparaben
* Probylparaben
* Ethylparaben


These preservative have a earned themselves a really bad name, because it is believed that they contain carcinogens. It’s up to you to decide whether you want to stop using products with chemical preservatives, because all natural products, even though more available now, are still far inbetween.

Commonly used natural preservatives are mostly Vitamin E (Tocopheryl not tocopheryl acetate), or Phenoxyethanol or also Wheat Germ Oil.



Humectants

Humectants draw moisture from the atmosphere to your hair and are therefore very moisturising to your hair. Not everyone’s hair likes humectants, and not everyone’s hair likes all types of humectants. You just have to play around and see what your hair likes. The trick to using humectants is to use them on humid or “wet” days. That way they would have something to draw on. On dry days (hot and extremely sunny/cold and dry), humectants will have the adverse effect. As they will not have any moisture to draw on, they will suck out the moisture from your hair, leaving it dry and hard.

The following are humectants:

* Glycerine or Vegetable Glycerine – clear, thick substance that is extremely sticky; to be used in small quantities
* Castor Oil or Jamaican Castor Oil (black or very dark in colour) – clear (or black), thick and sticky liquid; to be used in small quantities
* Sorbitol – clear liquid
* Honey
* Honey Moisturiser (clear and liquid formulation which can be bought online from suppliers)



Over-use of styling products or moisturisers that contain humectants can make your hair sticky and limp.


Other useful links

Nappturality:African-American, Black Natural Hair Care - Love Your Natural Hair (forum, articles and pictures; a bit full-on and militant sometimes but excellent information on how to care for our hair as well as excellent resources on styles and home-made recipes; free, but need to register in order to post threads or replies to threads)

Long Hair Care Forums (forum, pictures; relaxed and natural hair; you need to register to be able to view the hair forum (I think), and you need to pay $5 to be able to view all other forums)

Naturallycurly.com: Where curls come to life! (forum, articles; excellent information on product ingredients as well as the no-shampoo routine, which you can read about on motowngirl.com)

Akamuti ® - 100% Natural Skincare (vegetable oils and fats, shea butter and other natural skin care products)

Shea Butter, Cocoa Butter, Coconut Oil, African Black Soap wholesale from Akoma Skincare (bulk virgin shea butter – you can get a kilo for £8.99!)

Naturally Frizzy, Naturally Curly, Naturally Textured Hair (hair and skin care products)

https://anitagrant.com (natural hair and skin care products)