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Global cash crunch hits Nollywood

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Sola

Administrator
Staff member
Why do you feel the licensing cannot be monitored? I hear otherwise. Currently, they buy the movies at a higher price directly from the producers because they know it's for rental, about four to five times more.
It sounds like a NEW process, but it has been in use long before it was formalised. Producers like Tade Ogidan have been dispatching their home movies to video clubs using the method for years. It doesn't stop the so-called video club from buying off-the shelf to rent out like they have done for years, while keeping the recognised copies on the shelf for appearances' sake.
And the new framework factors rentals in to it. It will be monitored because they are going to introduce the bar code like you have here.
I have no problem with the new framework. Hopefully, it will foster some accountability. But you're dealing with a particular group of Nigerians who have "thrived" on the unscrupulous for many years here...As for bar codes, won't it require cash registers, scanners and related accessories to read it? Are the majority of these "video clubs" not tiny spaces in out of the way places anymore? Maybe I have lost touch. I haven't been home in a minute...
This kind of ethnic aspersions needs facts to support it.
I don't consider it an aspersion (I don't do that and I speak my understanding of the truth to my own, that's all) and it is supported by years of personal observations. We like piracy as much as the next guy and since our "video clubs" are mostly in unseen/unmonitored corners, who's to say my observations are not my "facts"? I have friends who flaunt wedding album size folders full of illegally copied VCDs and DVDs in my presence...friends who have seen a zillion home movies without paying for more than a handful... I may have been a tad hyperbolic, but the issue is undeniable.
Regarding disposable, Soludo's financial report on Nigeria said otherwise. The South West has the most disposable income.
The South West may have more disposable income, but does the report also itemise where the money goes? How does that say the consumers of Yoruba movies spend it on the movies in question and not on the next Owambe? And I did say "MAYBE they have less disposable..."
 
First of all, all you said are good points which i agree with fundamentally.

It sounds like a NEW process, but it has been in use long before it was formalised. Producers like Tade Ogidan have been dispatching their home movies to video clubs using the method for years. It doesn't stop the so-called video club from buying off-the shelf to rent out like they have done for years, while keeping the recognised copies on the shelf for appearances' sake.
But the idea of selling the copies at higher prices is to not worry about revenue. It's like telling a taxi driver. Bring me 2000 Naira daily. Anything else is his. The higher priced video operates that way so the trickery is irrevelant.

I have no problem with the new framework. Hopefully, it will foster some accountability. But you're dealing with a particular group of Nigerians who have "thrived" on the unscrupulous for many years here...As for bar codes, won't it require cash registers, scanners and related accessories to read it? Are the majority of these "video clubs" not tiny spaces in out of the way places anymore? Maybe I have lost touch. I haven't been home in a minute...
I agree it will be tough to implement but once you undertsand it is the banks funding it, thus big men, you know it won't fail. The guy who tells me this works for Eco bank. Eco bank has created a film fund and it was the banks that made NFVCB create the framework. The bigger ones will use a bar code. The smaller ones will not. The police will be dropping in unexpectedly to check and see if you are renting out illegal copies and will suspend licenses of violators. But to him, the key thing, is that the national distributors who they are funding will within two years will put the smaller ones out of business and then will we have national chains like Blockbuster and Hollywood Video. So with this framework, those corner-corner stores days are numbered.

I don't consider it an aspersion (I don't do that and I speak my understanding of the truth to my own, that's all) and it is supported by years of personal observations. We like piracy as much as the next guy and since our "video clubs" are mostly in unseen/unmonitored corners, who's to say my observations are not my "facts"? I have friends who flaunt wedding album size folders full of illegally copied VCDs and DVDs in my presence...friends who have seen a zillion home movies without paying for more than a handful... I may have been a tad hyperbolic, but the issue is undeniable.

The South West may have more disposable income, but does the report also itemise where the money goes? How does that say the consumers of Yoruba movies spend it on the movies in question and not on the next Owambe? And I did say "MAYBE they have less disposable..."
Fine. Now that you put it this way, I take the aspersions accusation back. Your point about disposable income has made me think. They calculated it based on holdings in the banks in the South West. People can move anywhere in Nigeria. Anyone can open a bank account anywhere. There is no rule against it. They report does not state ethnic affiliation so my saying that Yorubas have more disposable income is not guaranteed evenmoreso the fact, as you suggested we do not know what it is spent on.
 

takestyle

Well-Known Member
I have never believed this because how can a movie sell a million copies and be unavailable a year later on all the pirate websites but when I asked around, I heard in Nigeria, if you do not release it through the marketers, nobody hears of it. But if you want to avoid piracy, you release it outside Lagos. Supposedly tons of copies was sold in Cross Rivers and surrounding states. It was available at post offices and shopping centers though out the country.
yeah... i was going to say that they probably sold a lot of copies in Calabar (especially since everybody in Calabar seems to have been in it!) but Cross River is a small state, man... they definitely couldn't sell that many copies in that region alone!

well... it had a theatrical run in Lagos and Abuja, too; i wonder if they are adding those ticket sales to the tally?
 

takestyle

Well-Known Member
RE: Amazing Grace -

one thing i forgot to factor in: the movie has US distribution through Code Black Entertainment, sales via Amazon, Best Buy and Circuit City, and has been written up in Essence and other magazines. i don't know about 1 million copies, but i do know that it has racked up some decent sales in that arena.

in the home market, on the other hand? i think that might be a different story...
 

Henchey

Active Member
Amazing Grace is widely considered a well-made movie and i don't think a lot of people bought it.

Tunde Kelani's movies are also considered well-made in most quarters and he generally doesn't sell a lot of copies either, does he?

there's a lot more that goes into it than a movie simply being well-made, i'd say...
Not that I'm biased, and not that I'm stalking, but another grinning:for you here.
What Nollywood taught the African movie maker was that they had to connect to the people with relevance. There has never been, and will never be commercial success for filmmakers that focus entirely on the 'well-made' movie to the exclusion of content.
It applies across the board. Who was that Hollywood director that made that hyped 'classic' ('Eyes Wide Shut') that nobody saw, nobody understood and ultimately nobody liked?
The vast majority of 'African' movies pre-Nollywood ended up on library shelves in the west.
I'm all for high production values, but there also has to be a commerciality to the movie for the industry to thrive at this early stage. The two are not mutually exclusive.
 

takestyle

Well-Known Member
Not that I'm biased, and not that I'm stalking, but another grinning:for you here.
What Nollywood taught the African movie maker was that they had to connect to the people with relevance. There has never been, and will never be commercial success for filmmakers that focus entirely on the 'well-made' movie to the exclusion of content.
The vast majority of 'African' movies pre-Nollywood ended up on library shelves in the west.
I'm all for high production values, but there also has to be a commerciality to the movie for the industry to thrive at this early stage. The two are not mutually exclusive.
LOL thanks, Henchey...

and i think you have pinpointed an important idea that is in many ways at the heart of my disagreement with Vince (and to some degree, with Irinajoeda and Sisi).

in very base terms, what i see them saying is "EMG is bad because all they care about is money and YMG is the way of the future because they are all about the preservation and projection of their culture."

apart from being a gross simplification, i think this is a dangerous idea. because a lot of the things that have made Nollywood successful both in Nigeria and outside revolve around the blatant commercialism of it: the joyful tackiness, the nonchalant bad taste, the over-the-topness. it's a completely new paradigm for African cinema.

where i see YMG going (or at least the vision of YMG that has been presented to me throughout this conversation) is more and more in a direction similar to Francophone African cinema, which is now more or less moribund.

(in fact, the younger generation of Francophone filmmakers like Cheick Fantamady Camara seem to be taking some inspiration from Nollywood to pump some life back into its veins.)

i think film is a powerful tool for the preservation of culture, but when you start making cultural imperatives the central driving force behind a movie industry, you might be heading towards a commercial (and even artistic) dead end.
 

Sisi

Well-Known Member
LOL thanks, Henchey...

and i think you have pinpointed an important idea that is in many ways at the heart of my disagreement with Vince (and to some degree, with Irinajoeda and Sisi).
in very base terms, what i see them saying is "EMG is bad because all they care about is money and YMG is the way of the future because they are all about the preservation and projection of their culture."

apart from being a gross simplification, i think this is a dangerous idea. because a lot of the things that have made Nollywood successful both in Nigeria and outside revolve around the blatant commercialism of it: the joyful tackiness, the nonchalant bad taste, the over-the-topness. it's a completely new paradigm for African cinema.

where i see YMG going (or at least the vision of YMG that has been presented to me throughout this conversation) is more and more in a direction similar to Francophone African cinema, which is now more or less moribund.

(in fact, the younger generation of Francophone filmmakers like Cheick Fantamady Camara seem to be taking some inspiration from Nollywood to pump some life back into its veins.)

i think film is a powerful tool for the preservation of culture, but when you start making cultural imperatives the central driving force behind a movie industry, you might be heading towards a commercial (and even artistic) dead end.
pls, i would like you to exclude my name from your generalizations as the above bolded is your own view and not mine.

what i said and i still believe is that, the EMG is an igbo genre that does its castings on ethnicity basis. this and this has been the foundation/basics of my arguement.

i never catergorically stated what you just wrote about now. you were, that introduced these other comparisons of the two subs in the nigerian film industry becos you took the whole arguement/pointing out, as an attack on the igbos i.e. you tribalized it from the very onset and vowed to even spit a thick phlegm on my face anytime you did see it.

for the fact that henchey is hailing you on now, does not mean, you start forming up lies like you are ever quick to do.

i ve seen you are someone who is stuck on your own believes and never want to shift grounds nor learn. and to tell you the truth, am rather busy with some other pressing issues right now and don't really have much time to spend on an unyielding personality that you are (sorry if i came off saucy)!
 

takestyle

Well-Known Member
pls, i would like you to exclude my name from your generalizations as the above bolded is your own view and not mine.

what i said and i still believe is that, the EMG is an igbo genre that does its castings on ethnicity basis. this and this has been the foundation/basics of my arguement.

i never catergoricalled stated what you just wrote about now. you were, that introduced these other comparisons of the two subs in the nigerian film industry becos you took the whole arguement/pointing out, as an attack on the igbos i.e. you tribalized it from the very onset and vowed to even spit a thick phlegm on my face anytime you did see it.

for the fact that henchey is hailing you on now, does not mean, you start forming up lies like you are ever quick to do.

i ve seen you are someone who is stuck on your own believes and never want to shift grounds nor learn. and to tell you the truth, am rather busy with some other pressing issues right now and don't really have much time to spend on an unyielding personality that you are (sorry if i came off saucy)!
LOL

you're hilarious, Sisi! of COURSE the bolded text represents MY view... after all, I'M the one who said it, aren't I?
 

Sisi

Well-Known Member
LOL

you're hilarious, Sisi! of COURSE the bolded text represents MY view... after all, I'M the one who said it, aren't I?
since you agreed it was YOUR OWN VIEW you wrote in your reply post to henchey and definitely not mine, could you now take it a step further by not ascribing that view to SISI as you did in that particular post?

i would really appreciate if my name could be taken off ur generalization lines, once again.

thanks in advance.
 

takestyle

Well-Known Member
since you agreed it was YOUR OWN VIEW you wrote in your reply post to henchey and definitely not mine, could you now take it a step further by not ascribing that view to SISI as you did in that particular post?

i would really appreciate if my name could be taken off ur generalization lines, once again.

thanks in advance.
okay... it seems like the same way you misunderstood the phrase "for all you know" you seem not to understand what "to some degree" means.

Vince has stated (more or less) that his chief priority is seeing more Nigerian movies produced in indigenous languages as a means of preserving these languages and the cultures that accompany them.

i disagreed with that point of view.

Irinajoeda also expressed a similar opinion, though not as forcefully as Vince... but she did definitively state a few times that one of the things that makes YMG movies better than EMG is because Yorubas care about culture and Igbos only care about money (except for Zebrudaya and a few others).

i disagreed with her as well.

YOU, Sisi, focused more on the whole issue of ethnic-based casting... but a few times, you DID put forward the view that pride in culture was one of the things that would elevate Yoruba movies.

now mind you: you might have not championed this view to the degree that Vince, or even Irinajoeda did... but you DID nonetheless champion it on some degree, right? and I disagreed with it, am I correct?

if so, then what is the problem with my statement?
 

Sisi

Well-Known Member
okay... it seems like the same way you misunderstood the phrase "for all you know" you seem not to understand what "to some degree" means.

Vince has stated (more or less) that his chief priority is seeing more Nigerian movies produced in indigenous languages as a means of preserving these languages and the cultures that accompany them.

i disagreed with that point of view.

Irinajoeda also expressed a similar opinion, though not as forcefully as Vince... but she did definitively state a few times that one of the things that makes YMG movies better than EMG is because Yorubas care about culture and Igbos only care about money (except for Zebrudaya and a few others).

i disagreed with her as well.

YOU, Sisi, focused more on the whole issue of ethnic-based casting... but a few times, you DID put forward the view that pride in culture was one of the things that would elevate Yoruba movies.

now mind you: you might have not championed this view to the degree that Vince, or even Irinajoeda did... but you DID nonetheless champion it on some degree, right? and I disagreed with it, am I correct?

if so, then what is the problem with my statement?
am not going to pick your responses on one on one basis to answer to.

but like i did tell you previously, you know the basics of my own line of arguement.

of course i participated in the other aspects of the arguement championed by you; like the one you are presently foccused on for example,!

the moment you tribalized the whole thing, there was nothing else to do order than to reveal your folly at each attempt to put up a tribal arguement aimed at running down your perceived persecuting tribe.

lastly, as for your famous "for all you know, i am yoruba like you" statement; you can only keep on fooling yourself you are in the right. the world reading and i know, you did actually goofed and tried to put up a lie to confuse your blunder.
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
Ghana/nollywood star numero 8.We welcome him on the scene.I like the actor.grinning:

Alot of peeps seem to like him,i have only seen him in one movie,Game Boy (the same one with the title,play boy in ghana) i havent seen Crime to christ but Mildred Okwo says he did so well in that flick, she even predicts he would win an AMAA next year....am so looking forward to that movie then...
 
RE: Amazing Grace -

one thing i forgot to factor in: the movie has US distribution through Code Black Entertainment, sales via Amazon, Best Buy and Circuit City, and has been written up in Essence and other magazines. i don't know about 1 million copies, but i do know that it has racked up some decent sales in that arena.

in the home market, on the other hand? i think that might be a different story...
The one million copies in sales the producers were claiming is from Naija only. They announced it when it got US distribution. Did you miss the part where I said they used the churches to sell the movie to the congregation because of its religious themes?

I still doubt the number but it's possible because Nigerian churches produce movies too which they sell to the congregation. They report sales in millions as well.
 
Not that I'm biased, and not that I'm stalking, but another grinning:for you here.
What Nollywood taught the African movie maker was that they had to connect to the people with relevance. There has never been, and will never be commercial success for filmmakers that focus entirely on the 'well-made' movie to the exclusion of content.
It applies across the board. Who was that Hollywood director that made that hyped 'classic' ('Eyes Wide Shut') that nobody saw, nobody understood and ultimately nobody liked?
The vast majority of 'African' movies pre-Nollywood ended up on library shelves in the west.
I'm all for high production values, but there also has to be a commerciality to the movie for the industry to thrive at this early stage. The two are not mutually exclusive.
Please, no thrashing of Kubrick here. Nobody understood, nobody liked, (I understood and liked it ) maybe, but it sold well, based on hype but it sold.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
He was averagely good to me,also, until i saw this religious cum thriller flick called,"Crime To Christ".If he does not impress you in that one,then he never will.
I've seen one movie with him and was not impressed. Please, list good performances from him for me to check out.
 
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