How do Africans kiss?

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kaymax

Well-Known Member
#2
LOL, Oh my goodness, brotha said having tongue in his mouth is like meat in his mouth. ewooooo!! another brother says he makes the AAARTT konnekshun!!! What's with the laughing in the background when the woman was talking about burying her children...misplaced laughter.

All in all, this is good, it started funny, but got quite interesting.
 

Field Marshal

ABSOLUTE SUPREME RULER
#3
LOL, Oh my goodness, brotha said having tongue in his mouth is like meat in his mouth. ewooooo!! another brother says he makes the AAARTT konnekshun!!! What's with the laughing in the background when the woman was talking about burying her children...misplaced laughter.

All in all, this is good, it started funny, but got quite interesting.
.........it was was not nervous laughter as you stated, but the interviewer was sobbing. Listen to it again. @ frame 8:59, you can hear the interviewer sobbing saying "Sorry to hear that"
 

tunmi

Active Member
#4
It is true, I never saw Nigerians kissing in Naija. They showed their love differently, usually by teasing one another and you could see the emotion in their eyes and in their laugh. But yeah, I never saw kissing.

But....that does not mean they cannot kiss. Shebi, Majid dey do am. RMD do am. Kini sef, Muna, hin dey do am. Some people just, y'know, need lessons.

But the guy who had his last heartbreak 9 months ago was sad. I knew it was gonna be sad when he mentioned 9 months (as in you actually counted)
 

Kala Lou

Well-Known Member
#5
It is true, I never saw Nigerians kissing in Naija. They showed their love differently, usually by teasing one another and you could see the emotion in their eyes and in their laugh. But yeah, I never saw kissing.

But....that does not mean they cannot kiss. Shebi, Majid dey do am. RMD do am. Kini sef, Muna, hin dey do am. Some people just, y'know, need lessons.

But the guy who had his last heartbreak 9 months ago was sad. I knew it was gonna be sad when he mentioned 9 months (as in you actually counted)
Yeah dude was genuine....wish we could get some Nolly actors to portray emotions like that..I mean subtle, not over the top, slamming yourself on the ground, wailing...
 

Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#10
:roll
I don't just jump into kiss, I make the art connection (whattttt????)
LOL, I thought I was the only one that caught that, read my post above. Isn't that the brother that said the tongue was like meat in his mouth? LOL
Please ladies...
If you are not bovered allow a Brover to haves his artistic fantasy connection of kissings a persin he haves not yet even see. I'm very sure that in the fantasy the tongue is not a kpomo.
 

chiny11

Active Member
#11
African Art of Kissing

Hi all,

How do Africans kiss? A reasonable question, since we don't much go in for public displays of affection.

Google "origin of kissing" or the words "kissing" and "culture" and you learn that while the experts are not entirely sure whether kissing is an instinctive or learned behaviour, the weight of evidence points towards the latter. if that is the case – and it probably is, as there are apparently many Amazonian tribes that do not kiss at all – then it stands to reason that people are more likely to be at ease with kissing (in public and private) if they grow up in a culture in which kissing is not only accepted as a regular part of life but witnessed as such, and often.

This might explain the stiffness, awkwardness and timidity mentioned by some of the respondents in British-Nigerian film-maker and video artist Zina Saro-Wiwa's video installation Eaten By The Heart, which she conceived, produced and directed for the Menil Collection's The Progress of Love exhibition. It's a three-venue exhibition, so it's also on at the Pulitzer Foundation, St. Louis, and the Centre For Contemporary Art in Lagos.

Saro-Wiwa, daughter of the executed Nigerian author and activist Ken Saro-Wiwa, believes that the way we express love is organised culturally. "So many of us cite with confidence that love is universal. But the performance of love is, it seems, cultural," she says. "I wonder how the impact of how we choreograph and culturally organise the performance of love impacts what we feel inside and who we become."

Eaten By The Heart forms part of her video performance practice which currently focuses on the mapping of emotional landscapes, its resulting performative behaviours and cross-cultural implications.

In my experience, we become more comfortable with the practice with each generation. Children of the 70s, 80s and 90s are definitely more comfortable with kissing in public than their parents' generation. I have friends who never ever saw their parents kiss. Hug, maybe, but not kiss. Whereas I've seen these same friends exchanging deep kisses with girlfriends/boyfriends, and they didn't seem particularly self-conscious about it. I have to say, though, this was mostly among friends in Europe. I've seen friends in Nigeria kiss, too, but not often.




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