International Film Festivals

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vince

Well-Known Member
#1
Are our moviemakers ripe enough to bring out a movie that can represent us in these festivals,not to talk of winning a price of any sort?
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#2
RMD and TK were at the African Film Festival in NY in 2001. RMD brought Out of Bounds (directed by Tade Ogidan) and TK brought Thunderbolt.

Also, next year, the same fest will focus on TK, what they call a mid-career focus. TK is working on 3 movies specially for the festival.

Are our movies ready for international festivals? Some of them. And of course, they qualify only for the VIDEO entries section of the festivals. Most festivals don't have room for video productions.

What we produce is still not considered "movies" in many places. It is considered "home video" or something. It is just a huge problem, as we are unable to afford the kind of budget it will take to shoot cine.

Still, one consolation. Many universities around the world are studying the industry in classrooms. Many students are also writing their theses on the Nigerian movies.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#3
Originally posted by Sola
RMD and TK were at the African Film Festival in NY in 2001. RMD brought Out of Bounds (directed by Tade Ogidan) and TK brought Thunderbolt.

Also, next year, the same fest will focus on TK, what they call a mid-career focus. TK is working on 3 movies specially for the festival.

Are our movies ready for international festivals? Some of them. And of course, they qualify only for the VIDEO entries section of the festivals. Most festivals don't have room for video productions.

What we produce is still not considered "movies" in many places. It is considered "home video" or something. It is just a huge problem, as we are unable to afford the kind of budget it will take to shoot cine.

Still, one consolation. Many universities around the world are studying the industry in classrooms. Many students are also writing their theses on the Nigerian movies.
I don't think that it has anything to do with which medium one produces a movie.A lot of the movie entries in these festivals are made on video,but they are projected on celluloid.Some even are projected digitally,which by the way is getting more and more popular in these film fests.
I think any of the filmmakers who have the intension of presenting their works in these prestigious festivals should have their movies transferred to celluloid for projection.
 

mamarita

OJODTROUBLELOVER
#4
What about TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL, CANNES FILM FESTIVAL. Sometimes its not about how good the quality is, as much as showing something different. Look at MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING, The Canadian girl just shot a movie with her friends didnt even know the thing would make it out of Toronto. Same for BOLLYWOOD/HOLLYWOOD, for that movie you could tell they did not put in so much into making it.........The world just loves something different.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#5
Originally posted by mamarita
What about TORONTO FILM FESTIVAL, CANNES FILM FESTIVAL. Sometimes its not about how good the quality is, as much as showing something different. Look at MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING, The Canadian girl just shot a movie with her friends didnt even know the thing would make it out of Toronto. Same for BOLLYWOOD/HOLLYWOOD, for that movie you could tell they did not put in so much into making it.........The world just loves something different.
Exactamente!You hit the nail on the head there,girl.:) People always wellcome new things,direction,creativity in these festivals.That is why i think nigerian filmmakers can make an impact if they really put their mind to it.An international film award for a naija movie will do the industry a whole world of good and will really make the whole world sit up and take notice of NOLLYWOOD!:D
 

mamarita

OJODTROUBLELOVER
#6
Originally posted by vince
Exactamente!You hit the nail on the head there,girl.:) People always wellcome new things,direction,creativity in these festivals.That is why i think nigerian filmmakers can make an impact if they really put their mind to it.An international film award for a naija movie will do the industry a whole world of good and will really make the whole world sit up and take notice of NOLLYWOOD!:D
True that. I mean after bollywood, came The Guru with Heather Locklear...I mean common now!!! Now they have BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM, and they'll soon be bringing COOK IT LIKE MAMA or something.....And I'll say if GOOD WILL HUNTING can make it, we can!!!!! I'm writing d DUMBEST MOVIE EVER MADE, I'll be done in 2 yrs (yes I am still a full time student!!!) and I'll get it on the Toronto Film festival, and I know I'll make it:D
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#7
Originally posted by mamarita
True that. I mean after bollywood, came The Guru with Heather Locklear...I mean common now!!! Now they have BEND IT LIKE BECKHAM, and they'll soon be bringing COOK IT LIKE MAMA or something.....And I'll say if GOOD WILL HUNTING can make it, we can!!!!! I'm writing d DUMBEST MOVIE EVER MADE, I'll be done in 2 yrs (yes I am still a full time student!!!) and I'll get it on the Toronto Film festival, and I know I'll make it:D
I wish u the best of luck,girl!:) ;)
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#9
Transfer from video to celluloid via telecine is a very expensive proposition. There are probably some 20 places around the world where you can do it. The Dollars it will take to transfer a Naija movie to cine will be about a few times what it costs to produce the movie in the first place.

Its all justification. Can we honestly say appearance at the film festival is seriously worth the investment? What do we hope to immediately achieve at a film festival? To hopefully secure an international distribution deal. How have movies from Britain and France and India, who have been producing on cine faired in international distribution? Not too well. Only a few people in the international world care about seeing movies about people NOT from their country. We all watch movies to see people like us, see ourselves. Only the open minds or those interested in exotic things watch an international movie, so for us, it may not be justifiable yet. Look at the few movies from obscure countries and film makers that have made money internationally... very few. The real market for the Nigerian movie maker abroad is first, Nigerians, and then the few interested in exoticity.

To transfer also, you have to package the initial product from the beginning with that in mind. Many shoot on DV now and just send it to cine later. And these are sometimes professionals who shoot at the right fps for conversion. SOme shoot DV, transfer to Digital Betacam to cut an say an Avid, do color corrections and then transfer video to film. Our movie turn around time for profit prohibits this now.

Video projection has reached a high quality now, so some festivals do have it, but what I mean is that not all festivals accept video. The festival itself must be a "film and viedo" festival to accept such.

Digital projection is rather rare, Vince. It exists, but it is even rarer at film festivals. Most film festivals are small, really. Someone just wakes up and decides he wants to do it. Many are simply designed to make money, believe me. Commercial ventures that you have to pay to get into. Only a few big ones around the world are worthy of our attention - or the few that directly target our market (or people).

But I see your optimism and I agree with you that things have to grow, change. Time, friend... Time. :)
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#10
Originally posted by Sola
Transfer from video to celluloid via telecine is a very expensive proposition. There are probably some 20 places around the world where you can do it. The Dollars it will take to transfer a Naija movie to cine will be about a few times what it costs to produce the movie in the first place.

Its all justification. Can we honestly say appearance at the film festival is seriously worth the investment? What do we hope to immediately achieve at a film festival? To hopefully secure an international distribution deal. How have movies from Britain and France and India, who have been producing on cine faired in international distribution? Not too well. Only a few people in the international world care about seeing movies about people NOT from their country. We all watch movies to see people like us, see ourselves. Only the open minds or those interested in exotic things watch an international movie, so for us, it may not be justifiable yet. Look at the few movies from obscure countries and film makers that have made money internationally... very few. The real market for the Nigerian movie maker abroad is first, Nigerians, and then the few interested in exoticity.

To transfer also, you have to package the initial product from the beginning with that in mind. Many shoot on DV now and just send it to cine later. And these are sometimes professionals who shoot at the right fps for conversion. SOme shoot DV, transfer to Digital Betacam to cut an say an Avid, do color corrections and then transfer video to film. Our movie turn around time for profit prohibits this now.

Video projection has reached a high quality now, so some festivals do have it, but what I mean is that not all festivals accept video. The festival itself must be a "film and viedo" festival to accept such.

Digital projection is rather rare, Vince. It exists, but it is even rarer at film festivals. Most film festivals are small, really. Someone just wakes up and decides he wants to do it. Many are simply designed to make money, believe me. Commercial ventures that you have to pay to get into. Only a few big ones around the world are worthy of our attention - or the few that directly target our market (or people).

But I see your optimism and I agree with you that things have to grow, change. Time, friend... Time. :)
I agree with most of your point,especially with the telecine transfer cost,but i think presenting a well made naija production in events like the CANNES is worth the investments on the transfer cost.This might bring more people to invest in the industry.And who knows it mihgt open the door to the use of HD as the aqcuisition and mastering format therefore bypassing the need for celluloid.
But like u said,time will change things.one step at a time.:)
 
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