Nigeria Inside Hollywood's Work

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Okestra007

Mr. Lover Man
#1
I remember last year, when Bourne Identity was released, I didn't feel like seeing it, until someone told me that there was a Naija guy in the movie and that he spoke in Yoruba in one of his scene. The following day, I found myself on the way to the movies to see Bourne Identity.

I know we've all seen one or more movies that feature Naija, so let's start naming them and say a little about the movie. You never know who may like the movie or have missed the scene and will do anything to find out.

I'll go first, in Bourne Identity, the black man that Jason Bourne was sent to kill Wombosi (Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje) spoke Yoruba to one of his bodyguard. I think he said "Mio ti so fun e tele? Ori o pe"
 

bluestocking

Well-Known Member
#2
The movie that starred Bruce Willis, i can't remember the name now, i know it had something to do with the Sun, it's a movie about the Biafran war.
There were a lot of scenes where they spoke igbo and even some hausa too.
 

Pete

Well-Known Member
#3
bluestocking said:
The movie that starred Bruce Willis, i can't remember the name now, i know it had something to do with the Sun, it's a movie about the Biafran war.
There were a lot of scenes where they spoke igbo and even some hausa too.
I think it's Tears of the Sun or something like that
 

mimi victor

Well-Known Member
#6
Tears in the sun is one movies that someone i forgot the name called unto Nigerians to boycott. I went to rent this movie before i even read the boycott thing I could,nt watch ten minute of it. because all the garbage i saw did not represent the country i come from. we are not the blood thirsty animals that the movies portray of us to be so i will not recomend it to anybody to see
 

Alaaworan

I No Be Gentleman
#7
Tears of the Sun was a really bizarre re-telling of the Civil War. I saw it on DVD, although I don't remember hearing any Igbo or Hausa (I confess I wasn't paying much attention). I heard most of the actors used were non-Nigerians, and the movie was shot in Hawaii.

Star sightings--Anybody familiar with the show 'Oz' will know Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje's notorious "Adebisi". Right now, there's also a mini-series running on the US cable channel TNT called "The Grid". It supposedly features a plotline about Al-Qaeda-type terrorists in Nigeria.

There was also a crappy episode of "Law & Order" (popular American detective TV show, for those that don't know) which featured a plotline based on the 'Boy Adam' murder in London. Come and see people attempting Naija accents--you will never complain about Nollywood pipu blowing phone again if you saw that episode :roll
 

vince

Well-Known Member
#9
Sweetchocolate said:
I Sooo Love Tears Ofthe Sun..i Was Crying When I Saw It..
Are you sure it was not a naija version you saw,sweetie?Only naija movies make people shed crocodile tears.
 

surf419

Well-Known Member
#10
That movie pissed me the hell off i left the theater flashing the no.1 sign at the screen First of all it was shot in the rice fields of Hawaii :confused: , then we (Nigerians) were running to Cameroun???, then as if that wasn't bad enough, we had a King and Queen, Hello? Democracy or Dictatorship, then to finish it off it's not as if they were well dressed (the royalty). Bruce Willis and his bs renegade of two bit soldiers rush in to save us :fbreath . I honestly cease to comment on this lest i blow a fuse. On to the next round of movies with Nigerians. :)
 
#11
Sugar Hill: Starring Wesley Snipes.

Wesley's character in a drug business meeting with some Nigerian guys who are speaking to each other in Yoruba: "Awon Akata lo ko wa ba mi meeen. Mo ti so fun e meeen, mi o le se business pelu awon Akata yi meeeeen!".

Wesley then asks: "What da fuck he's talking about? What's all this Akata shit anyway?!". The Nigerian guy then answers: "It means lost American sons of slaves, you know, cotton pickers".

An enraged Wesley looks to his partner, looks back at the Naija guy, then drops him with a right hook. Full blown Katakata erupts. Classic scene.

2nd Bass Jare
 
#12
I Have Watched Tears Of The Sun Several Times And I Am Still Watching It .i Like It But One Thing I Am Sure Of Is That This Film Has Something To Do With Sierra Leone.the Attrocities Committed In This Movie Was Just A Picture Of The Ten Years Civil War.
 

blackbutterfly

Well-Known Member
#13
There are several home folks that representing Nigeria to the fullest on American television/magazines/calendars..besides Wale

1. Oluchi...she is better looking than Naomi Campbell and Tyra Banks combined!

2. Chet Anekwe was one of the finalist on ESPN 2 Seeking an Anchor series as well as guest starring spots on several television shows...www.chetanekwe.com

3. Ngo - www.getingo.com

4. Ebbe Bassey - a Calabar girl who has been seen on Law & Order:SUV, NYPD Blue as well as Showtime's short film "Spoonful of Sugar." www.tupukweli.com

5. Ibrahim Samande - talented musician/singer/songwriter

Nigeria's are blowing it up slowly but surely...

Y'all check out MomentumMV magazine for info on Nigerian's blowing it up in the US.
 

Okestra007

Mr. Lover Man
#14
Exorcist II
When the Father was looking for Kokumo, and he went back to Africa. He came into the mist of these Yoruba guys, he asked them for Kukomo. But I guess they didn't understand what he said, so they assumed that he looking for a whore. They said "O fe yami" "O fe da'mira" "O ya mabo" "Kalo" etc. They then took him to this house where there's this topless and small boobed girl.
 

almondJOY

Reppin' tha Igbo Negroes!
#15
2nd Bass Jare said:
Sugar Hill: Starring Wesley Snipes.

Wesley's character in a drug business meeting with some Nigerian guys who are speaking to each other in Yoruba: "Awon Akata lo ko wa ba mi meeen. Mo ti so fun e meeen, mi o le se business pelu awon Akata yi meeeeen!".

Wesley then asks: "What da fuck he's talking about? What's all this Akata shit anyway?!". The Nigerian guy then answers: "It means lost American sons of slaves, you know, cotton pickers".

An enraged Wesley looks to his partner, looks back at the Naija guy, then drops him with a right hook. Full blown Katakata erupts. Classic scene.

2nd Bass Jare

i didn't know that's what akata meant! no wonder my parents never say that. i first heard that word from my naija friends 2 years ago here @ college. wow, i learned something new!

Oh! and Igbo people were on the show, "MARTIN" . Actually, they were just actors speaking horrible Igbo, but since subtitles were on the screen, you could decipher their "language" haha. What happened was, Martin helped save the king's life when he was choking @ a restaurant and the king wanted wanted Gina as a concubine. Martin had no idea what that meant and agreed to it, until he learned the meaning...but yeah, that was the best episode ever!(since most Africans in movies/shows are Yoruba...but i ain't hatin'...) :stretch
 
#16
almondJOY said:
i didn't know that's what akata meant! no wonder my parents never say that. i first heard that word from my naija friends 2 years ago here @ college. wow, i learned something new!
Actually the word Akata is a yoruba word for a certain type of goat or donkey used for carrying heavy loads or working in the field all day and night, just like the slaves back then. That's where the connection came from.

It's a bad thing to say or call people. When I was in the States last year, my friends were using that word endlessly, and "Kokoye" for Spanish people, where did that come from?!

These words are derogatory, try not to use them girl. Stay blessed.

2nd Bass Jare
 

bluestocking

Well-Known Member
#17
surf419 said:
That movie pissed me the hell off i left the theater flashing the no.1 sign at the screen First of all it was shot in the rice fields of Hawaii :confused: , then we (Nigerians) were running to Cameroun???, then as if that wasn't bad enough, we had a King and Queen, Hello? Democracy or Dictatorship, then to finish it off it's not as if they were well dressed (the royalty). Bruce Willis and his bs renegade of two bit soldiers rush in to save us :fbreath . I honestly cease to comment on this lest i blow a fuse. On to the next round of movies with Nigerians. :)
The story was told from the American point of view. I was so mad when i watched it too, but my dad saw a few of the scenes and he was like yes, some of those things did happen during the war.I think the person who wrote the script just had to embellish it a little,in the false hopes that it would be a box office hit. i'm sure nothing of the sort happened.

like Surf said, since they were trying to tell a story about Nigeria, would it have been too much to expect that they'd have shot the movie in naija or at the least get a few naija actors.
 

Okestra007

Mr. Lover Man
#18
almondJOY said:
i didn't know that's what akata meant! no wonder my parents never say that. i first heard that word from my naija friends 2 years ago here @ college. wow, i learned something new!

Oh! and Igbo people were on the show, "MARTIN" . Actually, they were just actors speaking horrible Igbo, but since subtitles were on the screen, you could decipher their "language" haha. What happened was, Martin helped save the king's life when he was choking @ a restaurant and the king wanted wanted Gina as a concubine. Martin had no idea what that meant and agreed to it, until he learned the meaning...but yeah, that was the best episode ever!(since most Africans in movies/shows are Yoruba...but i ain't hatin'...) :stretch
I remember that episode too, it was funny as hell. The so called king tries to buy Gina off Martin.
 

almondJOY

Reppin' tha Igbo Negroes!
#19
yeah, i never liked the work akata anyway. i try not to use words i don't know the meaning to!.
oh and lover man, yeah, that's obviously the only Martin episode my parents loved!
 

mimi victor

Well-Known Member
#20
2nd Bass Jare said:
Actually the word Akata is a yoruba word for a certain type of goat or donkey used for carrying heavy loads or working in the field all day and night, just like the slaves back then. That's where the connection came from.

It's a bad thing to say or call people. When I was in the States last year, my friends were using that word endlessly, and "Kokoye" for Spanish people, where did that come from?!

These words are derogatory, try not to use them girl. Stay blessed.

2nd Bass Jare
To my knowledge AKATA is a wild cat and The term was use to address a group of certain Americans because of their wild behaviour by the early Nigerians who came over here for their education like you said it is derogatory KETEKETE i.e donkey is deferent from AKATA
 
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