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Nr Book Club reviews

Discussion in 'NEWS, BOOKS, CULTURE' started by KikisMuffin, Jun 13, 2007.

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  1. KikisMuffin

    KikisMuffin I no get ya time!!

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    All the reviews go on here.
    You guys please dont divert this thread, any post that is not a review or related to the discussion will be DELETED Sorry to seem heavy-handed but, we've got to have some order.:)
    Will move other reviews here.
    Thanks for complying...
    Signed Bluestocking :D






    Brilll.........Let me start with my review if this great book

    HALF OF A YELLOW SUN

    I have read this book twice in the space of 5 months. It's a story that is close to anyone's heart. The Biafran story must be told, it is a part of our nation's history..and what better way to tell it than through the eyes of a group of ordinary people that went through it all.

    It was brilliantly woven through the lives of 5 main xters: A pair of twins, their spouses(one an igbo lecturer, the other a british journalist) and a houseboy named Ugwu...the central figure!!!!!

    I loved this book, reading it was like an education and an understanding of my family. I was born long after the war, but because my parents had me very late, I have much older siblings that went through the war as children. And this book helps remind me of all the stories my sisters and brother have told me about their experiences as children in the war. Their stories where sometimes funny, sometimes sad and sometimes tragic and Ms Adichie captured all that essence in her great book.

    Its a story of ideals, inner conflict, survival and the struggle that any one goes through in life even in times of peace. Chimamanda kept me enthralled with her narration through it all and I love her for it.

    It does have its cons....some of which I'm sure will be expressed here. For now all I can say is it was a great read. I recommended this to a non-nigerian/non-african who knows nothing about the nation's history etc, and what he said at the end of it was..."I want the other half of that yellow sun" Brilliant!!!! I cant wait for Adichie's next book.

    PS

    Some ground rules Blue, I think we should establish...please in giving reviews dont tell us the whole story oh...so that those that havent read go still fit enjoy am...abeg una!sweat:
     
  2. buda atum

    buda atum Active Member

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    Great writer!
    grinning:​
     
  3. Funmibaby

    Funmibaby Well-Known Member

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    I want in the book club!!! I've already read Half of a Yellow Sun:

    Overall, I think the book was well written and easy to follow. For me there were a couple of characters that I had an affinity for and would have loved to spend more time with, the houseboy, Ugwu and Kainene, the somewhat aloof twin sister. Which for me highlighted the one thing I wished we had more of in this book, development of characters. I find myself not so much attached to many characters of the book because I couldn't figure them out, i didn't know their motivations, and it wasn't very well alluded to in the book. Some people in literary review may comment that that in itself is the beauty, that this book is sort of a slice of what obtains as normalcy during this chaotic period. Sort of if you were to pick in through the windows at any given time this is what you'd see. But without development of the characters, i'm left wondering, as Olanna does throughout the book, how did her relationship with her sister get to be the way it was?!? does Kainene love Richard? What's with Alice? What's with Odenigbo's Yoruba colleague? What's with the African American lady? What's with Olanna's neighbours in the village? What's with Odenigbo? he seems a bit one-tracked, which turns to delusional/withdrawn, then he seems harsh, but at times he's portrayed as "lovingly"?

    Still, I enjoyed the book and was anxious to see what kind of rollercoaster life would throw at these unassuming people next. What I liked about it the most was that it brought that time period in such a way that it is relatable to modern times.
     
  4. KikisMuffin

    KikisMuffin I no get ya time!!

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    Gbam at bolded, I never quite understood the first, and felt the 2nd wasnt really developed.
     
  5. bluestocking

    bluestocking Well-Known Member

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    Nr Book Club (reviews)

    All the reviews go on here.
    You guys please dont divert this thread, any post that is not a review or related to the discussion will be DELETED Sorry to seem heavy-handed but, we've got to have some order.:)
    Will move other reviews here.
    Thanks for complying.
     
  6. danitaylor

    danitaylor Lips of an Angel

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    WOW! great book.once u pop you cant stop.
    A good insight into not just the war but also the human aspect of the war.the authour weaves her intresting xters in such a way that we are able to relate to them,I felt wat the felt i practically entered the book.I was born way afta the war in the north so i knew next to nothing bout Biafra.
    The book gives an inside into how war affects peoples lives,the emotional ,psychological,and physical trauma changes they have to undergo.
    Like Funmi said alot of issues where not attended to,but there was enough drama,not just the war other issues that kept me occupied.
    I think its a must read for every nigeria.Im eargely awaiting her next book.
     
  7. bluestocking

    bluestocking Well-Known Member

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    Here's my review, which is not really a review :)

    For me, this was not just another book. It was a story, an account of my history, my parent’s history, where I come from. I cried when I read it.

    The main feeling that I had after reading the book was anger, I was very angry at the writer for making me confront these tales, angry at Nigeria for sweeping all that happened under the carpet and angry at my parents for never fully giving me all the details. I know it was a work of fiction but it was based on the reality of a war that did happen. This was not the first time I’d read about the Biafran war, but this was the first time I’d read with an understanding, and with maturity. I suddenly feel like my eyes have been opened.

    I also feel a deep sense of loss, for all the lives that were wasted, for my parents lost youth, loss of innocence. This overwhelming sense of loss for a republic that I never knew. Sometimes I felt like I was there when it all happened, and I knew how it would all end but felt helpless to stop it.

    Reading this book was a journey I was reluctant to embark on, I resented the fact that I had to face the truth about the war, but if we don’t know where we are coming from how do we know where we are headed? I want to remember, I want to tell my children about it. Not because I want to hold on to my anger or pain, but because to forget is to let it happen again. If we forget, we will make it possible for history to repeat itself.

    Was it a great book? Frankly I can’t say, but it was so real and felt vaguely familiar too.
    Of the main characters, Ugwu was the least developed. I just couldn’t picture him in my mind, he had this elusive quality, even though there were peeks into his mind, he just didn’t feel fully formed somehow.
    However, it was well researched and I liked the way she changed the igbo dialects effortlessly from when they were in Nsukka and when they were in Umuahia. It takes an eye for detail to be able to do that.
     
  8. KikisMuffin

    KikisMuffin I no get ya time!!

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    LOL @ reviews..I guess we shouldnt call our summaries on these books reviews really, abi?

    Thanks for this club Blue, it was a great idea. Okay on your "review"

    You arent the first person to comment on Ugwu's xter being underdeveloped(Funmibaby also alluded to that). I actually thought Ugwu's xter was well and truly covered and a few others less so, like Miss Adebayo in the script.

    Adichie is a sucker for detail, I saw that in Purple Hibiscus and its great you noticed that too in her writing style.

    I guess from reading your review its evident that this book will mean different things to different people, but like yourself, my entire family was part of the subject matter, the war, and as such it held special interest. Nice one Blue!grinning:
     
  9. jamaicayute

    jamaicayute Naija Movie Lovah

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    My review coming up
     
  10. Funmibaby

    Funmibaby Well-Known Member

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    Good review!

    It's funny a lot of people have said this about reading the book, and a lot of Igbo people too! Though me i'm Yoruba, my mom used to talk about the time of Biafra a lot to us, I think even maybe two years ago in my family we had a big argument about it, my sis, my brothers, my mom and I (I don't want to go into what we were arguing about cuz trust me, it's a whole nother thread!). She told us that when the war actually broke she was in secondary school a couple of hours drive away from home and they had sent everyone home for school so everyone started trekking back. She told us of how scared she was at the time cause they didn't really understand what exactly was happening, they had never experienced war before. My mom, even up til today, gets very passionate when she talks about the politics of the time.

    So in my house the Biafra world was very real to us cause we discussed it. My mom even has coins and money from both sides that she cherishes very greatly til today!

    Even apart from that in my high school in America, i think in Grade 11, in my social anthropology class, my teacher showed us one of those educational CNN videos and it had documentaries on different years so we watched 1968, 1969, and 1970. And it showed what was happening all over the world in those years and what it was like to live in those times and the Biafran War featured VERY STRONGLY in it, with pictures and interviews and I remember people were asking questions about it.

    So in someway I was familiar with it, I just didn't know that many people aren't.
     
  11. bluestocking

    bluestocking Well-Known Member

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    I'm not saying, that i was unfamiliar with it. You cant have parents who were there are not be familiar with it. I'm saying though that the book kind of brought home the realities of the war. You know when my folks used to talk about it, it sometimes sounded like folk tales and they'd never go into details about what they went through. You wont believe it, but this book actually made my dad for the first time really sit down and talk about what happened to him in detail. Something that never happened before.


     
  12. danitaylor

    danitaylor Lips of an Angel

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    good point.
     
  13. Funmibaby

    Funmibaby Well-Known Member

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    i'm so glad the book did that! what positive comment, i wonder how many families this book as opened up that same opportunity for!
     
  14. KikisMuffin

    KikisMuffin I no get ya time!!

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    I'm hoping many!! There are many stories within families that never get told for 1 reason or the other, literature like this opens it all upgrinning:
     
  15. Tiron

    Tiron Well-Known Member

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    My ordered copy from Amazon is on the way. Can't wait to read it! Will review after.
     
  16. danitaylor

    danitaylor Lips of an Angel

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    especially those of us at the north.gave my copy to my dad.
     
  17. Abike

    Abike Well-Known Member

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    Finally got my copy, and its a book I CANT put down!!! Full review will come when I finish....!
     
  18. KikisMuffin

    KikisMuffin I no get ya time!!

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    Can't wait dear. Glad you're back
     
  19. sidney

    sidney Well-Known Member

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    SPOILER ALERT​


    An interview with the Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    I almost listened to it when I read someone's comment that she gives away some of the story in the interview... But I still thought I should post the link...

    I have not gotten my copy yet!! I will soon and enjoy it on my vacation next week.... grinning:
     
  20. KikisMuffin

    KikisMuffin I no get ya time!!

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    Thanks for the link Sid

    Enjoy your vacationgrinning:
     
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