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Ojukwu is doing well in London – Obi

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takestyle

Well-Known Member
I read Half of a Yellow Sun thinking I would find out what really caused the war. I hear phrases like the factors that led to war are still with us today. But the book did not do a good enough job at all of addressing the real reason war broke out. It skirted around the issue really. It was a rather disappointing read. It only sprinkled references to the notion that people thought the Igbos wanted to control everything. Or at least that is what I thought Chimamanda made reference to at one point.The Rwandan genocide was heard the world over. Then again, that was in the 1990's. Most Africans are lost to the fact that a civil war ever broke out in Nigeria. I don't think 8 out of 10 West Africans even know about it. Not my generation.
Well, then that is due to the ignorance of your generation because the Biafra war was never any secret. It was widely publicized, being the first major African civil wars in modern history and the one of the first televised wars in the world in general.

What's more, Ojukwu used propaganda as a key weapon in the war, so a lot of work was done to "advertise" the war, with the images of starving children broadcast across the world. Many Western celebrities (most notable being John Lennon and Yoko Ono) staged very public protests against the war. It was on the covers of all the magazines and newspapers throughout Europe and the USA and it was on TV every single night.

If you or others of your generation don't know that there was a civil war in Nigeria it's certainly not because it was never given any coverage.
 

Brooms

A Pimp Called Slickback
Well, then that is due to the ignorance of your generation because the Biafra war was never any secret. It was widely publicized, being the first major African civil wars in modern history and the one of the first televised wars in the world in general.

What's more, Ojukwu used propaganda as a key weapon in the war, so a lot of work was done to "advertise" the war, with the images of starving children broadcast across the world. Many Western celebrities (most notable being John Lennon and Yoko Ono) staged very public protests against the war. It was on the covers of all the magazines and newspapers throughout Europe and the USA and it was on TV every single night.



If you or others of your generation don't know that there was a civil war in Nigeria it's certainly not because it was never given any coverage.
You are talking about the generation born in the 70's. Those of us born later heard very little of it. By the time we came came around, the propaganda had long died down and little if anything was said about it in schools, on TV etc. Especially in schools.
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
Chukwuma Kaduna Nzeogwu.. Movies about Nzeogwu and Joe Achuzia would be amazing.. Very interesting stories...
How about Major Emmanuel Ifeajuna ? Remember he won the Silver medal for Naija in the long jump event at the 1958 Vancouver commonwealth games. A university graduate who later went on to be one of the prime movers of the first Nigerian coup. Eventually executed along with Major Alale, Mr Agbam and Col. Victor Banjo as a saboteur in Biafra. I just find the guy intriguing and don't know why folks don't like talking about him. There are some who believe he was the originator of the coup, before bringing in Nzeogwu, Ademoyega, Onwuategwu, Anuforo and co.

ciao
 

Dsampler

Well-Known Member
.......so, how about the role of the Russians? I heard they were supplying arms to Ojukwu while the British were arming Nigeria,...and we, like a bunch of mumus, used the weapons to continue to kill ourselves. What a shame! How true is this?
 

sidney

Well-Known Member
You are talking about the generation born in the 70's. Those of us born later heard very little of it. By the time we came came around, the propaganda had long died down and little if anything was said about it in schools, on TV etc. Especially in schools.
I guess the point is that there is tons of information out there about the war. Especially with the amount of information available to you on the internet, from books you can buy on Amazon to Time Magazine archives online to youtube. If you really want to study the war, you can.

We know about the American revolution, Civil war, WW1 and WW2 and none of us were born during that time. Your generation should never hinder you from learning about the past....
 

sidney

Well-Known Member
.......so, how about the role of the Russians? I heard they were supplying arms to Ojukwu while the British were arming Nigeria,...and we, like a bunch of mumus, used the weapons to continue to kill ourselves. What a shame! How true is this?
Even Israel supported Biafra.
 

uch21

Active Member
the old imo isnt the imo of today? i obviously wasnt refering to the "old imo". they did not reach Imo. and even if they did, it was during the cloisng of the war so it wasnt as much impact as the 1st states that got defeated. why u think imo is named the heart of the igboland?
Actually FM is right, the war did reach the now Imo/Abia state just that these states were not defeated before the war ended.
lol, and trust it had that much impact too, i know of a dude from the villa(Mba5) who was a product of naija soldiers raping igbo women,war is such a terrible thing sha.
 

Dsampler

Well-Known Member
I even hear say, Lagos was one of the best places for an Igbo person to hideout during the war. They said all Igbos that stayed back in Lagos while others were rushing back home, were well protected by the Nigerian government. They said Gowon was indeed, a hero of the war. Anyone knows how true this is?
 

sidney

Well-Known Member
..yeah. Initially, they sent in some Egyptian weapons captured during their 1967 war with the Arabs, before the USA & Britain put pressure on them to stop supply Biafra with weapons.
As usual they just used us African as pawns in their own power game... The Israeli support was interesting as they went against the USA interest...
 

sidney

Well-Known Member
I even hear say, Lagos was one of the best places for an Igbo person to hideout during the war. They said all Igbos that stayed back in Lagos while others were rushing back home, were well protected by the Nigerian government. They said Gowon was indeed, a hero of the war. Anyone knows how true this is?
I never heard of Gowon called that...

I wish I knew more about this, but I once heard that Jack was chosen because Murtala didn't want it.. Not sure how true it is. But it is telling that it was Murtala that forced out Gowon. And it was the coup attempt to return Gowon to power where Murtala was killed.
 

wendydoks

Well-Known Member
I read Half of a Yellow Sun thinking I would find out what really caused the war. I hear phrases like the factors that led to war are still with us today. But the book did not do a good enough job at all of addressing the real reason war broke out. It skirted around the issue really. It was a rather disappointing read. It only sprinkled references to the notion that people thought the Igbos wanted to control everything. Or at least that is what I thought Chimamanda made reference to at one point.The Rwandan genocide was heard the world over. Then again, that was in the 1990's. Most Africans are lost to the fact that a civil war ever broke out in Nigeria. I don't think 8 out of 10 West Africans even know about it. Not my generation.
no she didnt touch on the issue @ all or maybe a little but not really. the book focused on the war itself. i dont think she was able to force the main reason the war sparked into that novel since it was based on fictional characters and how they lived during the war. its not suppose to be a history novel. it is for you to do the rest.
 

sidney

Well-Known Member
no she didnt touch on the issue @ all or maybe a little but not really. the book focused on the war itself. i dont think she was able to force the main reason the war sparked into that novel since it was based on fictional characters and how they lived during the war. its not suppose to be a history novel. it is for you to do the rest.
I need to read that book...
 

wendydoks

Well-Known Member
Actually FM is right, the war did reach the now Imo/Abia state just that these states were not defeated before the war ended.
lol, and trust it had that much impact too, i know of a dude from the villa(Mba5) who was a product of naija soldiers raping igbo women,war is such a terrible thing sha.
ok thanks. not being defeated doesnt equal to not invading. i misunderstood it.




@Dsampler, igbos were being killed in lagos too. and during the war, being the capital of naija, it was on naija's side ofcos.
 

wendydoks

Well-Known Member
How about Major Emmanuel Ifeajuna ? Remember he won the Silver medal for Naija in the long jump event at the 1958 Vancouver commonwealth games. A university graduate who later went on to be one of the prime movers of the first Nigerian coup. Eventually executed along with Major Alale, Mr Agbam and Col. Victor Banjo as a saboteur in Biafra. I just find the guy intriguing and don't know why folks don't like talking about him. There are some who believe he was the originator of the coup, before bringing in Nzeogwu, Ademoyega, Onwuategwu, Anuforo and co.

ciao
Ifeajuna was among those that sabotaged biafra? isnt this an interesting twist especially where this "igbo interest coup" is concerned?
 

wendydoks

Well-Known Member
I need to read that book...
it is tres interesting and raw. she brought the war to live. its a great read.. odenigbo, Olanna, Ugwu, kainene and richard a white man are the main characters. my favourite character is kainene oddly enough. lol i really couldnt drop it. i was addicted to it until i finished it. and then wasmad cos i wish it had part 2 :laugh: her other novel purple hibiscus is good too. the thing around your neck is also good.grinning:

quick synopsis

Among the protagonists are Odenigbo, or "the Master", a radical maths lecturer at the University of Nsukka - in what became the secessionist Igbo land - and Ugwu, the village teenager who becomes his houseboy, but whom he enrolls at the university staff school. A novel that descends into dire hunger begins with Ugwu's devoted creativity in the kitchen, confecting pepper soup, spicy jollof rice and chicken boiled in herbs. Beer and brandy flow as he serves the Master's friends while absorbing snippets of intellectual debate in the era of Sharpeville, de Gaulle in Algeria and the struggle for US civil rights.

Ugwu's domain is encroached upon by Odenigbo's lover, Olanna, the London-educated daughter of a "nouveau riche" businessman in Lagos, and the household is later disrupted by its links with Olanna's periodically estranged twin sister Kainene and her English boyfriend, Richard.

Ethnic differences are signalled between the mainly Igbo protagonists - whose persistent switching between English and Igbo languages is wonderfully conveyed - and those such as Odenigbo's Yoruba colleague, Miss Adebayo, and Olanna's ex-boyfriend from the north, the Hausa prince Mohammed. These differences assume lethal significance after the ostensibly Igbo-led 1966 military coup, which becomes a pretext for anti-Igbo pogroms after the counter-coup six months later. As Olanna and others become caught up in the violence, the novel captures horror in the details of "vaguely familar clothes on headless bodies", or corpses' "odd skin tone - a flat, sallow grey, like a poorly wiped blackboard".




i found some reviews for you...



"Before Darfur, before Rwanda, there was Biafra. Adichie's powerful second novel retells the shocking story of the ethnic cleansing and mass starvation in this breakaway territory of Nigeria in 1967—one of the first of Africa's genocidal tragedies broadcast live in the West yet shamefully neglected there. A Nigerian, Adichie creates memorable characters torn between modern privilege and tribal ties . . . Masterfully, Adichie dissects their reactions as barbarism disrupts their bourgeois comfort and they struggle for survival."

— Lee Aitken, People Magazine (four stars)

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marlenepinto, September 17, 2008 (view all comments by marlenepinto)
What an amazing book!!!! I picked it up for one of the most irrational reasons - I liked the look of the cover - and it's a decision I'll never regret. This is my first introduction to African writing and it completely had me hooked - for a person who was never interested in history, this has whetted my appetite for more such writing. A historical period woven into a dramatic, sensitive and emotional tale with an effortless style, a must buy for any book lover.

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"I was swept along...rarely have I felt so there, in the middle of all that suffering. I wasted the last fity pages, reading them far too greedily and fast, because I couldn't bear to let go. There are not many novels where war is seen mainly from the women's point of view, rather than that of the soldier, which makes this one double valuable...a magnificent second novel—and can't fail to find the readership it deserves and demands."

— Margaret Forster

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by Pattee Fletcher "MsInformation" (Maryland) -
I could not put this book down! The story grabbed hold of me immediately and soon I was living in the lives of the main characters. There are many ways to look at this book: it is a love story; a history; about African culture; about starvation; a war story; a book about families and loyalty; it is about facing fatal horror and trying to find meaning; it is literature; and it is a keeper.
The plot cannot be condensed into one theme or story. It is about loving someone with whom you have real and painful differences, the heartache, companionship, and ultimately, acceptance of each other and of the love that you have. It is about how disparate members of a family cope with plenty and with poverty. It takes you into the war for Biafra and the details are harsh, stark, and they make you pause.
Adichie presents us with an honest story; there are no happy endings; many compromises. This is the beauty of the story - it is honest, real, lyrically relentless in depicting a point in time that was a shame of a nation; of a world.
Adichie's novel will haunt you and it will stand the test of time.
 
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