Sony announces Kick-a$$ Camera!!

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Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#23
I'm still kicking myself for getting that Nikon D3100, I recently discovered that my Nikon D40(1st gen dslr) takes better low light pictures.

The kit lens on the GH2 I ordered is a 14-42mm, I saw some clips of shot with the lens..and it didn't wow me. I also ordered a 14mm pancake lens, which I think I'll be using more of till I can afford a 20mm and a fish eye for music videos.

Up until recently I've been enjoying using FCPX but recently the X has been freezing up on me...maybe it's because I have a few unfinished projects running at the same time...
The 'stock' lenses be it the 14-42mm or 14-140mm are not that bad; the only problem is they start at f3.5 and shift to f5.6 during a zoom (I have not verified the shift on Panny, but I'm very sure they do). The bad news is all stock lenses are generally rubbish for low-light filming. The 20mm f1.7 will give you a ton more light at night, having said that, if you use a LOT of light or shoot in bright daylight you'll be ok with any of the stock lenses.
 

Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#26
True! Steve Jobs said "If you don't canibalise your own products, someone else will"... or something like that. Let Canon keep on being the losers and playing it safe with over-priced stuff. Oh well, NAB 2012 starts in about 11 days... let's see the price point of the Canon 4K HDSLR.
UPDATE: It's $15,000 for the unavailable Canon 4K HDSLR... oh and it's rubbish 4K... and (possibly) $35,000 for their 'drawing-board' but 'real' 4K camera. Back to the HDSLR - it's still a freaking stills camera - who in their right 'indie' mind will pay 15Gs for that? It's NOT a Hasselblad or Leica! Canon just get dumber and Dumber. The Canon 5D Mk II was an accident a total fluke! Idiots!!!! Hissssssssss!!!!!!!!
 

Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#27
Cool...Okay just dropped my first dime in the piggy bank...hopefully I get to $10Gs before 5K comes out...
Kala you see these people them wahala? Things move fast and now RED hit back with the successor to the MX sensor - the 6K 'Dragon' sensor.

It's funny... the TV broadcast world is still struggling with simple 'true HD' and I bet in 3 or 4yrs there will be 'true' 8K recording.
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#28
So VB, how much is this new Sony "kick-ass' new camera? Am planning on getting something a bit affordable to help me practice and work with but then i want to stay away from the CANON's. Apart from the fact that everyone is using it, i am yet to see a film shot with it that looks different. I love my film to look good, but not in-organic like the CANON and most DSLR's do.

I don't know much about this new camera but from the description you have given it, it sounds good. Is it different from the new 'black-magic' camera you posted recently?
 

Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#29
So VB, how much is this new Sony "kick-ass' new camera? Am planning on getting something a bit affordable to help me practice and work with but then i want to stay away from the CANON's. Apart from the fact that everyone is using it, i am yet to see a film shot with it that looks different. I love my film to look good, but not in-organic like the CANON and most DSLR's do.

I don't know much about this new camera but from the description you have given it, it sounds good. Is it different from the new 'black-magic' camera you posted recently?
I think it will be less than $10,000 in the US some say it might be around the $8,500 mark which is a pretty amazing price considering the 'features' - do note that 4K recording will cost much more... but how many people are ever going to 'need' to shoot in 4K? The frame rates right out of the box are worth that much and immediate 'true' 1080 I think.

For real bro Canon have gone down the route of greed... their 'kinda' 4K DSLR is $15,000!!!!!! (It's still a freaking 'stills' cam... 15G's my a$$ - freaking idiots) They have set their eyes on Hollywood since the 'Nov 3' announcement of the C300. So for me it's goodbye Canon. Oh and their C500 will be $35,000.

The Sony camera is very different from the BlackMagic camera in that the BlackMagic shoots RAW. I will do a more techie post on what's what in the camera world later during the week that simplifies and explains 'general' stuff.

Are you looking at docos, narrative or stuff that needs quite a bit of VFX?
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#30
I think it will be less than $10,000 in the US some say it might be around the $8,500 mark which is a pretty amazing price considering the 'features' - do note that 4K recording will cost much more... but how many people are ever going to 'need' to shoot in 4K? The frame rates right out of the box are worth that much and immediate 'true' 1080 I think.

For real bro Canon have gone down the route of greed... their 'kinda' 4K DSLR is $15,000!!!!!! (It's still a freaking 'stills' cam... 15G's my a$$ - freaking idiots) They have set their eyes on Hollywood since the 'Nov 3' announcement of the C300. So for me it's goodbye Canon. Oh and their C500 will be $35,000.

The Sony camera is very different from the BlackMagic camera in that the BlackMagic shoots RAW. I will do a more techie post on what's what in the camera world later during the week that simplifies and explains 'general' stuff.

Are you looking at docos, narrative or stuff that needs quite a bit of VFX?


Thanks bro. I really appreciate it. Am looking to make shorts with it, as many shorts as i can. Narrattives yes, no VFX for me yet till i can at least get a hack of what and what to do but it would be nice if the camera is flexible just incase i get to that route soon.

We use a Panasonic HMC 150 for our digital shoots in school which is pretty cool too. But i want something more handy, gives the film look and very functional with colors to an extent. You do know the CANON's can only take a maximum amount of light since the camera itself can film in low light which for me i don't like since i do like to be able to determine how much light goes into a shot.
 

Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#31
Thanks bro. I really appreciate it. Am looking to make shorts with it, as many shorts as i can. Narrattives yes, no VFX for me yet till i can at least get a hack of what and what to do but it would be nice if the camera is flexible just incase i get to that route soon.

We use a Panasonic HMC 150 for our digital shoots in school which is pretty cool too. But i want something more handy, gives the film look and very functional with colors to an extent. You do know the CANON's can only take a maximum amount of light since the camera itself can film in low light which for me i don't like since i do like to be able to determine how much light goes into a shot.
Ok, if you're looking at shorts (for now) you will be thinking of a large sensor camera. I will touch on the first paragraph in the 'Camera World' thread.

The Panny HMC150 isn't a bad camera but with a 1/3 chip you'll never get a 'filmic' look unless you -
A) stand 5miles from your subject and zoom all the way in
B) Use a 35mm adapter - negates the point in this day and age; 4yrs ago YES, today NO!

Seriously, if you don't yet own a camera and want to shoot 'shorts' or even a 'feature' (depending) go all out 'indie' and get the hang of a DSLR.

On the second part of your second paragraph I try to explain what I think you were saying/asking -

Not just Canon but DSLRs in general are very good for lowlight shooting BUT because they are we tend to forget we SHOULD still light scenes - even 'dark' scenes.
DSLRs are cheap and can deliver a very 'filmic' look straight out-of-the-box even with the crappiest, cheapest lens on the planet.
All light going into any camera can and should be controlled by the 'shooter' - DSLRs do NOT have built in ND filters so having a 'Vari-ND' is practically a must if shooting in bright dylight (the link is reference sample ONLY as you can see they come in various sizes depending on the lens you want to use).

One problem some people run into is not using the 180 dgree shutter speed rule which is can make video look really weird when using DSLRs (and other cams too). So in bright daylight you need a way to shoot at the 'apeture' YOU want (depending on the look you are going for) and a way to cut down the light going into the camera. For stills there is no problem changing the shutter speed but for video - that is a problem!

You're in the US at the moment right? That's NTSC land - you guys shoot 30p & 60p because the electricity there is 60Hz. UK and Nigeria are pal so we shoot 25p & 50p as 50Hz electricity. Same thing goes for 'interlaced' rates. For a cinema film you'd most probably be shooting at 24p.
So back to the lght thing you can change your shutter speed in 'mulitples' of the rate for whatever country you are shooting in... especially if you notice 'flicker' from the artificial lights.
The 180 degree rule applies to video/film in that shutter speed is approx twice the value of your frame rate. So let's say you are shooting 24fps then the selected shutter speed on your camera should be 1/48th but many cameras dont do that... the next closest is 1/50th. If your shooting 30fps (NTSC) then your shutter speed is 1/60th - this 'rule' keeps a 'filmic' look. Again the problem is, especially with DSLRs, how to keep that rule with your chosen appeture in bright daylight? The sole reason every DSLR shooter should always have a Vari-ND. It solves the light issue you were talking about.

Hopefully that's what you meant??

DSLRs do have a big learning curve if you want to use them very well. I think they are worth it because we have never been able to get a 'filmic' look out of ANY camera for 'peanuts'.
And also remember 'dual-system' sound is a must too!
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#32
Ok, if you're looking at shorts (for now) you will be thinking of a large sensor camera. I will touch on the first paragraph in the 'Camera World' thread.

The Panny HMC150 isn't a bad camera but with a 1/3 chip you'll never get a 'filmic' look unless you -
A) stand 5miles from your subject and zoom all the way in
B) Use a 35mm adapter - negates the point in this day and age; 4yrs ago YES, today NO!

Seriously, if you don't yet own a camera and want to shoot 'shorts' or even a 'feature' (depending) go all out 'indie' and get the hang of a DSLR.

On the second part of your second paragraph I try to explain what I think you were saying/asking -

Not just Canon but DSLRs in general are very good for lowlight shooting BUT because they are we tend to forget we SHOULD still light scenes - even 'dark' scenes.
DSLRs are cheap and can deliver a very 'filmic' look straight out-of-the-box even with the crappiest, cheapest lens on the planet.
All light going into any camera can and should be controlled by the 'shooter' - DSLRs do NOT have built in ND filters so having a 'Vari-ND' is practically a must if shooting in bright dylight (the link is reference sample ONLY as you can see they come in various sizes depending on the lens you want to use).

One problem some people run into is not using the 180 dgree shutter speed rule which is can make video look really weird when using DSLRs (and other cams too). So in bright daylight you need a way to shoot at the 'apeture' YOU want (depending on the look you are going for) and a way to cut down the light going into the camera. For stills there is no problem changing the shutter speed but for video - that is a problem!

You're in the US at the moment right? That's NTSC land - you guys shoot 30p & 60p because the electricity there is 60Hz. UK and Nigeria are pal so we shoot 25p & 50p as 50Hz electricity. Same thing goes for 'interlaced' rates. For a cinema film you'd most probably be shooting at 24p.
So back to the lght thing you can change your shutter speed in 'mulitples' of the rate for whatever country you are shooting in... especially if you notice 'flicker' from the artificial lights.
The 180 degree rule applies to video/film in that shutter speed is approx twice the value of your frame rate. So let's say you are shooting 24fps then the selected shutter speed on your camera should be 1/48th but many cameras dont do that... the next closest is 1/50th. If your shooting 30fps (NTSC) then your shutter speed is 1/60th - this 'rule' keeps a 'filmic' look. Again the problem is, especially with DSLRs, how to keep that rule with your chosen appeture in bright daylight? The sole reason every DSLR shooter should always have a Vari-ND. It solves the light issue you were talking about.

Hopefully that's what you meant??

DSLRs do have a big learning curve if you want to use them very well. I think they are worth it because we have never been able to get a 'filmic' look out of ANY camera for 'peanuts'.
And also remember 'dual-system' sound is a must too!


I agree with you. I was referring to all DSLR's in my statements and not just canon. I used canon as a reference since almost everyone and anyone i have seen owns and uses a canon 5D, 7D etc. But its all good, i get your point exactly.

Thanks for the enlightenment. Am not very good with camera variations and just learning about the peculiarities of each ones. Will take your notes seriously, thanks.
 

Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#33
I agree with you. I was referring to all DSLR's in my statements and not just canon. I used canon as a reference since almost everyone and anyone i have seen owns and uses a canon 5D, 7D etc. But its all good, i get your point exactly.

Thanks for the enlightenment. Am not very good with camera variations and just learning about the peculiarities of each ones. Will take your notes seriously, thanks.
You're welcome. If you can, try to get some practice with the DSLR your friend has; play around with all the settings both on the camera and the lens... say what you did into the mic and when you play the footage back you'll learn what various things do.

Lol, don't worry about the Canon thing. A lot of shooters when 'upgrading' will shift base as Canon seems to be hell bent on going down the Hollywood route... ONLY!!
 

moviewizard

Well-Known Member
#34
You're welcome. If you can, try to get some practice with the DSLR your friend has; play around with all the settings both on the camera and the lens... say what you did into the mic and when you play the footage back you'll learn what various things do.

Lol, don't worry about the Canon thing. A lot of shooters when 'upgrading' will shift base as Canon seems to be hell bent on going down the Hollywood route... ONLY!!


Noted! Sure will!!!
 

Village-Boi

Well-Known Member
#37
Hmmmmmm ok so the 4K recorder that this amazing FS700 camera (and new ones coming) will use is the 'R5 SR Recorder' and will cost something like $19,000?? Well FS700 owners will def not be buying it. Maybe 'rentals' and the owners of the soon to come ($22-$25,000) F5 camera that is to be a direct RED Epic competitor. We await more news.

EDIT: Sorry peeps, wrong info - The Sony F5 is a canon C300/C500/RED Scarlet competitor while the Sony F55 is the RED Epic target.
 
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