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Stephanie Okereke premieres "Through the glass"

Discussion in 'Announcements, Introductions, Guidelines' started by moviewizard, Sep 14, 2008.

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  1. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    Really? Thought i read somewhere that she went to film school and did a course. Na wetin i read oh, since i dont know Stephanie personally abi. Even watched her on tv a couple of times and she said she did a course in a film school and that has been a long time. How long is it that she hasnt finished?
     
  2. filmdirector

    filmdirector Guest

    Just to comment. I see TS train of thought and i would like a decent discussion on it. I think it makes for good discussion.

    Would a film directed by John Woo a chinese with maybe one or two chinese, all other caucasian characters shot and produced in America funded by an American producer without any chinese themes be called a chinese movie? Did Jackie Chan in Rush hour make it a chinese movie?

    Lets bring it close to home - If i or anyone here directed a film with Kevin Costner, Al Pacino with maybe one africa in there - the theme as unafrican as it can get - will anyone really call it a Nigerian movie? And why?

    I saw Stephanie's trailer and apart from her appearance, in no way did I remotely see it as a Nigerian movie. I actually see this movie taking her away from Nollywood.

    I assume Nigerian movie is a movie shot in Nigeria or about Nigerians on a Nigerian topic.
     
  3. raskimono

    raskimono Active Member

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    Naija movie or not?

    Sorry. I've been missing in action. Thanks MW for welcoming to the board. Regarding whether it is a Nigerian movie, I think it is. Stephanie who said she produced it is Nigerian. It's why i was very specific and did not call it a Nollywood movie. There is an action movie called Taken starring Liam Neeson that is considered a French film but the whole language is in English. It will be released in America by Fox but the whole money to produce the movie was from France. It will be eligible for the Cesars, the French Oscars. Or let's take another example, the 'Korean' movie D-War that is set largely in LA and stars Americans in the lead but the production company is Korean. It's considered a Korean movie. A lot of countries use source of funding for determining the status of a movie, thus the use of the phrase Naija produced movie and not Nollywood movie. Hope I cleared it up.
     
  4. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    Well the question now is if we dont call it a nigerian movie then what should we call it? Nice discussion though and believe me i understand you guys.
     
  5. filmdirector

    filmdirector Guest

    Generally i can't place labels as accurately as others but I believe if it is funded in America, stars Americans mainly, with an American or mainstream feel though directed by a Nigerian it is simply an Indie film by a director of Nigerian heritage.

    If you go anywhere in the world and say, "A Nigerian movie" then anyone hearing that expects certain elements and most especially that it should have a strong clear Nigerian theme or POV.

    I haven't seen Stephanie movie but from the trailer it doesn't fit that. Of course i could be wrong. The main movie might have a lot of 'Nigerianness' splattered through out.
     
  6. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    :fing24:
     
  7. moviewizard

    moviewizard Well-Known Member

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    I have to see the movie to be able to say much sha but i see you guys point and it would definitely be hard to call it a nigerian movie with all these factors. Anyways i wish her the best of luck in her pursuit, everyone around me is so loving the trailer oh.
     
  8. sidney

    sidney Well-Known Member

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    Very interesting topic. I had a friend ask me, what is considered a "Nollywood" movie. Is is a movie filmed in Nigeria? Filmed by a Nigerian? Starring a Nigerian? A combination or what? I actually didn't have an answer..

    Interestingly we all know what is considered a Hollywood or Bollywood movie.
     
  9. NTB

    NTB Well-Known Member

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    This movie is NOT Nollywood. It is an American Movie. In any case I love what I just watched.
     
  10. NTB

    NTB Well-Known Member

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    Brilliant comments and questions. It is not a Nollywood movie in terms of the industry that it was produced in. It can be considered a Nigerian movie in relation to the producer and in terms of given credits to a person. In defining a movie one must be clear in the terms of reference. Sade and Seal are Nigerians but their music is not.
     
  11. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    fair enough, raskimono... i actually agree with you: the most fundamental criteria to me are

    a) the location/nationality of the production company,
    b) the makeup of the crew, and to slightly lesser degree
    c) the orientation of the subject matter

    Taken is produced by French filmmaker Luc Besson, whose movies are considered to be French movies despite the fact that he has long opted to shoot them in English and/or with American and British actors (The Professional, The Fifth Element, The Transporter series, etc.). (many of them are also co-productions)

    but if you look at Besson's movies, you find that there is a certain percentage of French personnel involved in the production... in fact, if i recall correctly, Besson originally had trouble getting The Fifth Element recognized by the Cesars because there were too many Americans involved in it and he didn't really meet the French quota.

    (anybody here who has ever applied for government-based financing will understand this.. depending on the country, you must demonstrate that there a significant percentage of citizens from that country are employed in the production in order for it to be considered a product of that country.)

    now, is Stepahnie Okereke's Next Page Productions a Nigerian production company?

    ...kinda, i guess. not because Stepahnie herself is Nigerian but if i am going to take the information here to be accurate:

    LADYBRILLE.com

    so the company is based in Los Angeles... and Nigeria.

    it's a tough call for me. the company's first production is made in California... most likely with an American (student?) crew and predominantly American cast... i dunno.

    maybe you can call it a "Nigerian movie" in a sense because (if?) all the financing came from the pocket of a Nigerian, but there's at least one other criterion that i tend to value personally even though i can't completely vocalize it to others...

    what does the movie teach you about the country?

    i don't mean that in terms of its subject matter (though that does matter on a level) but i mean: how is it representative of the state of filmmaking in that country?

    a movie like Amazing Grace, despite the number of foreigners involved in it, does tell you a lot about the style, conditions and mentality of film production in Nigeria.

    when i look at a movie like Through the Glass (and obviously, i have not actually watched the movie... so i mean the trailer) that's made in America with an American cadst and crew and American subject matter, and it looks, sounds and feels like the average straight-to-DVD American indie... but it was produced by a Nigerian...

    > sigh < i don't know... maybe i should not have even broached the subject in the first place!

    actually, i strongly disagree with you here: on this board in particular, i see people using the term "Hollywood" to refer to any movie that features white people speaking English, even if it is indie or British.

    i mean, look at the link i posted above: Through the Glass is described as a "Nollywood-Hollywood hybrid"... what, pray tell, is "Hollywood" about it?

    likewise, i see the term "Nollywood" being abused, too... people use it to describe any movie that is made by a Nigerian or an actor who is Nigerian.

    i have seen people refer to actress Carolyn Chikezie as "Nollywood."

    i have seen people use the term Nollywood in reference to a movie like Shoot the Messenger directed by Ngozi Onwurah and starring David Oyelowo.

    i have seen people use the term "Bollywood" to describe Mira Nair's films Kama Sutra and Monsoon Wedding, or a movie like Bride & Prejudice (though a slight case kinda can be made for that one, i think)

    generally, i believe people put a bit too much stock into the nationality of directors and actors... *shrug*
     
  12. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    thank you, NTB... i think you have better expressed what i was trying to say with "what does it tell you about the state of filmmaking in that country?"

    basically, it is the industrial context that the film is produced within.

    some may argue that this is irrelevant--and i would understand their point of view--but i think it's important.

    how can you say, for instance, "this is the best-looking Naija produced movie" when it is produced in a context that is far removed from any other "Naija movie," y'know?

    it's kinda like a different animal to me.
     
  13. samira

    samira Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmm, so what will 'Sarifina' with Whoopi Goldberg and a bunch of SA be called? South African or American movie? interesting topic
     
  14. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    Sarafina was a coproduction (South Africa/France/UK/USA) but it's a movie that i'm okay with calling "a South African movie," if only because of the subject matter.
     
  15. sidney

    sidney Well-Known Member

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    I was actually refering to "we", the general public and not NR specifically. Although that may also be incorrect.
     
  16. takestyle

    takestyle Well-Known Member

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    i hear you... but yeah, i would say most people in general confuse the terms as well.
     
  17. filmdirector

    filmdirector Guest

    I think at some point the labels get blurry. But I know for me if you say French/German/ Nigerian movie, i will be thinking of not just director, but the feel/ style of the movie, country of production, cast and subject matter.

    I have a film colleague here in Norway that has co-produced a film with an Australian company, cast are Americans (A- LIST) and Austrailians, director british i think and the crew Australian filmed in Australia. Would you call it a Norwegian film, British film or Australian film?

    Stephanie is making IMO an American Indie film.
     
  18. ddizzle

    ddizzle Aunty!

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    Well Takestyle, NTB and sidney have great Valid we tend to find somewhere to squeeze Nollywood into a project to attract the viewers of Nollywood

    Im happy for steph this is a big step and i hope the premier goes well...abeg someone give a review so i can see whether i should cop this or not.. i done with the whole supporting with out hearing reviews cause half the time i toss the reciept and cant have it returned!
     
  19. Ayesha

    Ayesha InaAni - Classic Beauty

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    Its not a Nollywood movie.. I have already seen it.. It is an American Indie movie.. that was shot in Los Angeles.. It does not have a Naija story line.. the only thing is that there is a Nigeriain in the movie!
     
  20. NTB

    NTB Well-Known Member

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    Thank you for clarifying. Miss you
     
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