The Last King of Scotland: New Idi Amin Autobiographic Movie

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KikisMuffin

I no get ya time!!
#46
Don Cheadle was great - accent and looks matched. Don did a great job of affecting an East/Central African accent. But not Sophie. Sorry but I found her British accent and her mixed-race appearence unconvincing. She was supposed to be playing the black, French/Kinyarwanda-speaking wife of the Rwandan hotel manager, Paul Rusesabagina. But her British accent came over too strong and any body from that region or who is familiar with the region would have found her accent/looks out of place. There are several other black British and American actresses who could have been hired to play that role if they did not want a continental African.

For me, it was just like those East/southern Africans that they hired to play Nigerians in 'Phat Girlz'. Anybody familiar with anglophone African accents would immediately spot that these guys were from East or southern Africa.

Wow, okay, I'll watch it again, to see if I agree with your assessment, sounds valid enough, if she does indeed.

I like her a lot, so maybe I'm biased, but I think she did a great job. I'll have another look!:bouncy
 

Yetty Baby

Active Member
#48
THE NEW UPCOMING FILM BASED ON THE LEADER IDI AMIN sweat: of UGANDA.

the trailer itself for the actual movie is this here
http://us.rd.yahoo.com/movies/trail...08762866&f=1808762866&mspid=1809741200&type=t

THIS MOVIE STARS AMERICAN ACTOR FORREST WHITTAKER (THE DEPRESSED WIFE BEATER WHO RTN FROM VIETNAM IN THE MOVIE JASONS LYRIC) AND KERRY WASHINGTON (RAYS WIFE IN RAY CHARLES MOVIE)
http://blackvoices.aol.com/black_en...railers/festivalcircuit/last-king-of-scotland

(believe it or not i knew one of his sons, he ended up in ghana, and he told be he was one of many children, he claims he saw his father just a couple of times. )

ALL I CAN SAY IS THEY NEED TO LET AFRICANS STAR IN our OWN STORIES (SOMETIME) - let us star in it.

GENEVIEVE COULDA TAKEN KERRYS ROLE (dont be mad at me i want the best for Genny sweat:). GIVE US SOME SHINE TOO, ITS "OUR" STORY. LET US SHINE TOO - ABEG - AH AH.Anyway i guess sometimes they tell it best, since they have all the stuff to make it happen.

I am anxious to see this movie. I watched his movie in the 80s, you know the one where he ate ppl and had gazillion wifes. You know the one i mean rightsmokin: them asians in london i know still hold some strong animousity cos Idi kicked them the **** out, acting as though we all relate Idi Amin sweat:

One day i would love to attend one of these Toronto film festival or African Film Festival.

Anyway here are some ratings it got so far, but the problem is its in limited theatres nationwide (USA). Times like these i miss NYC, when you live in this village of ATL, it will take 4ever for this limited movie to get here.
An article on Whitaker's portrayal of Amin:


Forest Whitaker's Portrait of a Dictator


Web Extra: Hear an Extended Interview with 'Last King of Scotland' Star Forest Whitaker


Forest Whitaker as Idi Amin addresses a crowd in a key scene from The Last King of Scotland. Fox Searchlight © 2006




'The Last King of Scotland'
View scenes from the film:

VIDEO: Amin Rallies a Crowd of Ugandans
VIDEO: One of Amin's Murderous Moods

Day to Day, September 27, 2006 · Playing a character who is both loved and feared is a daunting task for any actor.

Forest Whitaker embraced just such a challenge in making the film The Last King of Scotland, which opens in theaters on Wednesday. Whitaker plays Idi Amin, the late Ugandan dictator who took control of the former British colony in the 1970s and ruled with an iron fist.

The film follows his story, seen through the eyes of a young Scottish doctor who finds himself thrust into Amin's inner circle.

Both charismatic and cruel, Amin was accused of ordering the killings of an estimated 300,000 people before he was deposed and forced to flee to Saudi Arabia in 1979.

During his rule, he gave himself a grandiose title -- His Excellency President for Life Field Marshal Al Hadji Dr. Idi Amin, VC, DSO, MC, King of Scotland Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Sea and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular.

Whitaker spent months in Uganda interviewing the dictator's family members and also with former government officials. He talked with those who had suffered at the hands of Amin. He even learned enough Swahili so that he could ad-lib dialogue with the Ugandan actors and extras working on the film.
 

Iya Laje

Well-Known Member
#51
I heard from Ugandans that he got the accent correct no be small...and that it took him like 3 months to lose the accent. All in all, I think he did a great job, even though I haven't seen the movie yet. I'm glad he won for best actor.
 
#52
I heard the man was very bad and having watched that film it didn't seem Idi amin was as bad as people said he was.


Rule number 1, never trust the Western media.
Even Saddam wasn't as bad as they said he was. They always try to ruin people's reputations when they can't control them. Just look at they way they're portraying Mugabe because he wanted land reforms.
 
#53
I heard from Ugandans that he got the accent correct no be small...and that it took him like 3 months to lose the accent. All in all, I think he did a great job, even though I haven't seen the movie yet. I'm glad he won for best actor.


Seen the movie and he did a fantastic job. I've got Ugandan friends and Whitaker speaks just like them.
 

Obariba

Well-Known Member
#54
Ugandans say-

THE Last King of Scotland, based on the life of the late dictator Idi Amin, is stirring up mixed reactions in Uganda. more:http://www.sundayvision.co.ug/detail.php?mainNewsCategoryId=7&newsCategoryId=123&newsId=550874


Thanks









Memories of Idi Amin Dada

DICTATOR: The late Idi Amin

THE Last King of Scotland, based on the life of the late dictator Idi Amin, is stirring up mixed reactions in Uganda. Actor Forest Whitaker is in the running for an Oscar today. We asked people who dealt with Amin or were affected by his regime what they thought of the movie and the man who inspired it.

“The film gives the wrong impression that Amin was humane and sometimes charming. That man was a beast.” Minister Kagimu Kiwanuka, 46, son of former Chief Justice Benedicto Kiwanuka, murdered by Amin.

“The film was not representative. Whoever was not here during Amin’s time would think it is just funny and entertaining. Amin was not funny.” Rhoda Kalema, 77, widow of William Kalema, former commerce minister, murdered by Amin.

“I think Amin was more brilliant, not daft like he was portrayed. Overall, I related Amin to Besigye because he was a very emotional man. He is a guy who would cry, jump, shout. Emotions ruined him.” Boston Barywa, 30, grandson of Amin.

“Amin betrayed so many of my colleagues and relatives, like (Erinayo) Oryema and Archbishop Janani Luwum. The film was a good attempt to portray the man Amin was.” Henry Kyemba, 70, Amin's Minister of Health.

From what I know and heard about Amin, I don’t think he was simple like that! He was more brilliant, not daft like he was portrayed. I don’t think he was that dense. He was illiterate, yes, but a genius nevertheless.

They also show a lot of booze around him. That was another mistake because Amin hated alcohol. I also noted the pool. I don’t think there was a nice swimming pool like that during Amin’s time.

My other disappointment is that Amin’s love for children was not shown. He really loved children, but they never portrayed that in the movie. He was a jolly man in the movie. Yeah, that was him in real life. Very jolly.

Overall, I think I relate Amin to Besigye because he (Amin) was a very emotional man. He is a guy who would cry, jump, shout... Emotions ruined him. For example, if he thought the mzungu was nice, he would not think twice about it. He would take him as a nice person.”

Violet Green, 34, Teacher — Rainbow International
“This movie is a little twisted. When I watched The Rise and Fall of Idi Amin, I could see the action. It gave the real story. This one did not portray the real story. It is not as scary. The best thing is that the film was brought back home. You know the people in the movie and can identify them.”

Elja Dijlestra, 24, Student

“I think it is a very good movie; very realistic. Everyone has a good side and a bad side. This time, the white guy does not save the situation. It helps understand why Uganda is as it is. Although Amin is a bad guy in the movie, you understand how he got there. It starts funny but turns serious.”

Henry Kyemba
“It brought back many memories. Amin betrayed so many of my colleagues and relatives, like (Erinayo) Oryema and Archbishop Janani Luwum. I loved and respected those people. The film was a good attempt to portray the man Amin was. I would have liked more scenes about those who worked with Amin, like (Isaac) Maliyamungu and the army. But only a few, like his health minister, appeared. It is an indication that there should be more efforts to record our history. Being a historian by profession, I find the film quite shallow. Since Ugandans are not very good at writing history, someone who does it for them should do it very well. My book would have given a better story. I do not mean it has it all. State of Blood was recorded at the actual time the events were taking place and it is not fiction. But at least, a lot of stories were taken from my book.”

Rhoda Kalema
“A lot of things are missing from the film. It is not representative of what actually happened. Whoever was not here during Amin’s time would think it is just funny and entertaining. Amin was not funny.

He was funny in the way he did his things because he had no ability to administer the country. He thought he could run the country because of all the guns he had at his disposal. I would have loved for the producers to have talked to some of the survivors of Amin’s terror and get a better picture.

Though they made a good attempt, the research was not adequate. I would, for example, have expected a scene where Amin declares his 18 points as to why he staged the coup against Milton Obote. When Amin took power, most of the ministers in the previous regime took off. He found himself without ministers. He had to appoint permanent secretaries and some of his friends to ministerial positions. Amin was also the first president to buy cars for his ministers.

All those scenes are missing from the movie. Amin’s problems started when he drove several trucks with soldiers from Gulu to Karuma Bridge and threw them into the river. He thought that without these soldiers from the north, he would have peace as president. The movie should also have shown Amin dissolving Parliament. He declared himself life-president and announced that he would rule by decree. There should have also been a scene or two showing some of his victims, such as the kidnap scenes and the fake accidents in which the Archbishop Janani Luwum, the inspector General of Police, the Governor of the Bank of Uganda, the Chancellor of Makerere University and the Chief Justice died. In general, the movie does not reflect the terror that Amin instilled in (the people of) this country, killing people with impunity. The movie is more about the doctor, whom I did not find very relevant. It is not good watching a movie like that just for entertainment. It is not a nature film. We must learn how to hand over our history.

I think the movie makers would have done a better job if they had consulted Henry Kyemba’s book, State of Blood.”

Simon Turner Sebadduka, 33, Project Manager, Malaika Honey
“I thought it was good. It brought out his human side and the fact that everyone around him was human. However, I think the book was better than the movie. As I watched, I thought they had left a few important things out of the story. But overall, it was a good movie. It was more about his relationship with his Scottish friend.”

Carlos Odora, 36, Malaria advocate — Africa Fighting Malaria
“I am ashamed that someone like that could rise up and rule this country. I hope we don’t have another Amin. It is a film that is shameful. It is a sad thing.”

Kagimu Kiwanuka
“The film gives the wrong impression that Idi Amin was humane and sometimes charming. That man was a beast, but Forest Whitaker portrayed him as a jolly and understanding person. Idi Amin never spoke English that well. Abby Mukiibi (who acts as Masanga, Amin’s army chief) would have done a better job. In fact, it should have been based on Henry Kyemba’s book, State of Blood. The writer of The Last King of Scotland (Giles Foden) did not clearly understand the issues he was writing about.

For him, it was like writing a travel story. To me, all the praise and accolades the movie is receiving are misdirected. It is important to state the facts as they were, for the whole world to know.

The younger generation has nothing much to learn from the movie and will not be able to appreciate the role of our freedom fighters. It is giving young people a wrong picture. And for the victims, the film reveals nothing. The movie only covers three years of Amin’s brutal rule. The directors should have contacted us to expand the scope of that history. I do not find the film emotional. But it still brings back painful memories. That man killed my father and so many other people.”


Brian Mugisha, 28, Programme Manager, Hives Save Lives - Africa
“I loved the movie. It brought out something that showed Amin was human. What made him feel bad is that he didn’t have anyone to trust. It summarises what we saw in the other movies about Idi Amin. I have watched them all but this one is the best because it was natural. The scenes and all the songs and soundtracks were Ugandan. I think that was very good. Also the fact that it was acted by our people made it real. The people in the other movies looked artificial.”

John Bahana, 55, Consultant scientist
“I felt like crying because so many innocent people died; like that doctor who was trying to help. Our problems started at that time and Uganda will never recover from that. I am always amazed when I hear people praise Amin after what he did. What is being done to make sure that things like that don’t happen again?”

Compiled by Elizabeth Namazzi, Elizabeth Agiro, Emmy Olaki and Emmanuel Ssejjengo

Published on: Saturday, 24th February, 2007
 
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