Tribalists Have Hijacked Nollywood - Lari Williams

Status
Not open for further replies.

Honourable

Mr. Naijarules!
#41
If Biafra exists with it's own flag, then Ooduawood exists, just that they are yet to wake up to that name.

Anyway, my plan is to nudge the Ooduawood producers that English isn't only for a particular tribe in Nigeria, it is for the whole of Nigeria and we must claim our stake!:bouncy
Hmmmmmm I also see you being the Genevieve of that future Ooduawood...but the problem is will they be able to afford ur A list status by then...::bouncy
 
#44
No I'm not psychic my dear, but my sources tell me you've been having meetings with the likes of Tade Ogidan & Tunde Kelani...:bouncy
Your sources are right! After being turned down some 50 times at auditions, I am still hopeful - you know they say, it's not over until it's over. I know my time will come and i'm hopeful that Tade will come through for me and cast me as a lead character in his upcoming flick. Surely that should get me the Dudu Osun endorsement i've been so craving for and maybe finally it will the chanting of Peaches, we love you from my fans all over the world that we will hear. Pray for me bro, I say pray for me!:bouncy
 

olofofogal

Let d smoke carry d point
#45
You right on the above comment. I gave away all my Igbonglish movies some two months ago when I no longer could stomach their stale movies. I have since turned to the Ooduawood movies now and I have to say they do come up with some solid story lines.

Enough silliness now. I actually think it won't be a bad Idea afterall for the likes of Tunde and Tade and a host of Ooduawood proffessionals to start casting purely Yorubas and maybe a sprinkle of other tribes in English. Yeah, that would give the world a better projection of how unified we are as Nigerians. Thanks for that heads of Ogonna, might just consider doing that myself.


P.S: You should come round to mine for tea sometime, it's so refreshing chatting with you. - Really, I mean it.




forget it,hes taken by me!!!:1087:
 
#46
What's with all the HUGE FONT ASSAULT now? Stop yelling at us jare...

As per the theme, tired discussion that takes no one anywhere. Uncle Lari is not getting jobs like Uncle Olu/Justus becuause he's not willing to do the things they do to get jobs...whatever that is. In addition, he says things you almost never hear from Olu and never from Justus. He's always done that in his numerous columns over the years, so he's definitely one person eyes would be plugged on. I would understand if he's not getting jobs.

As per nepotism, soja go, soja come na the story. We're all just in a hurry. Like Nigeria, everything in Nollywood will fall into place eventually. Time is the great revealer. 'Nuff said.
Thank you.
 

Honourable

Mr. Naijarules!
#47
Your sources are right! After being turned down some 50 times at auditions, I am still hopeful - you know they say, it's not over until it's over. I know my time will come and i'm hopeful that Tade will come through for me and cast me as a lead character in his upcoming flick. Surely that should get me the Dudu Osun endorsement i've been so craving for and maybe finally it will the chanting of Peaches, we love you from my fans all over the world that we will hear. Pray for me bro, I say pray for me!:bouncy
No problem Peaches, when that time come Honourable go support you 110%grinning:











....but emmmmm I no gree use dat Dudu Osun soap with una... l no want make ma skin rezembu Baba Suwe own.:bouncy :bouncy
 

grafikdon

Well-Known Member
#51
sweat: sweat: I like futbol no be small. Grafikdon, missed ya...where've you been?:love004:
Good to know...I know say we go play together...uhmmm please I was talking about actual football o not the 'slang footbal' before people mind begin go Sokoto...

I full ground dey flex my muscle...hoping to have a splendid Christmas...if not, I will pack my bags and relocate to Uranus.
 

Alaaworan

I No Be Gentleman
#57
As far as I know, one Kenneth Nnebue decided to experiment with home video in Igbo having observed the success of the Yoruba home videos which drew from the Ogunde and Ladipo movie era. Nnebue's smash hit 'Living in Bondage' inspired other Igbo people to venture into the movie business and eventually to experiment with movies in English. So as far as I know, its been a case of some Igbo individuals getting into the movie business on their own for commercial reasons and not because Ohanaeze Ndigbo directed them to do so as revenge on Awo and the Yoruba for 1951! Likewise, I don't recall any grand assembly of Ndi'Igbo at which it was decided to popularize Nollywood 'at the detriment of professionals'.[/b]

Well, I agree with the general point that it is not a commercial videomaker's responsibility to make sure every Nigerian ethnicity is proportionately represented in their works. That's the job of a sociologist or a statistician, not a video producer, trader etc. But there is a moral problem that other Nigerians might justifiably have with Igbo producers that systematically exclude them from their movies.

Similarly, I don't recall anyone seriously claiming that the Igbo started Nollywood. If I recall my history and social studies classes in elementary and high school, we were taught that the movie industry in Nigeria was started by the likes of Hubert Ogunde and Duro Ladipo. I don't recall while growing up ever hearing any Igbo person complaining that the movie industry was 'dominated' by Yoruba people simply because back then the movies were in Yoruba with predominantly or all Yoruba cast.

You must admit that the difference here is that folks cast in a Yoruba movie would more than likely have to speak the language. Since the vast majority of educated Nigerians speak English, what would the justification be for restricting the pool of actors, directors, cameramen, "welfare" folks, etc. to your particular ethnic group if not for reasons of bias?

As far as I can recall, other than some Igbo people who lived in Lagos/southwest and could understand the language, most other Igbo people simply watched what was available on NTA or when VCRs came, Hollywood, Chinese or Indian movies. I don't ever recall it being an issue among Igbo people that I knew that Ogunde was awarded a national honour and acclaimed the father of Nigerian cinema for producing films which few Nigerians outside of his ethnic group had ever watched or even heard of! The man was a pioneer in African filmmaking and deserved the award on that score at least.

Agreed that he was a pioneer--you are also forgetting folks like Dr. Ola Balogun, who made films in Yoruba, Igbo (the first such movie, I believe, and obviously with a predominantly Igbo cast), Hausa, and even Portuguese in one case.

Growing up, I recall seeing Yoruba language home videos in the homes of my Yoruba friends and when I moved to Lagos, I saw posters for Yoruba films to be shown at the National Theatre. But I never felt that it was an issue for me that some Yoruba showbiz impresarios made movies in their language and with mostly Yoruba cast.

No more than it would be an issue that Stephen Osita Osadebe or Sir Warrior etc. generally sing in their native language of Igbo.

I did not feel marginalized because the newspapers and magazines celebrated Yoruba actors and filmamkers. I usually skipped over such articles because I did not have a clue what the reporter was talking about. I did not understand Yoruba labguage so I did not take much notice of the movies or watch them unless I went to a Yoruba pal's house and there was a sub-titled version being shown. It was just not an issue at all. There was no big deal to it.

So the notion of Yoruba vs Igbo competition on 'ownership' of Nollywood is a big joke.


This is where I believe you are either wilfully dishonest or cannot see the truth. The issue is not ownership between Igbo and Yoruba--there are several hundred other ethnicities in the country, to start with, beside those two. The issue is whether in English-language movies that have come to be distributed primarily by Igbo marketers, there is systematic exclusion of other Nigerian ethnicities. Pointing to the 10% of English-language movies made by Yoruba, Urhobo/Delta folks (like the Amatas), Efik-Ibibio Eastern minorities (Emem Isong etc.) does not excuse the fact that 90% of the other English-language movies use Igbo staffers almost exclusively.

The movie business is open to all. No one is forced to buy or watch movies which are displeasing to him or her. Likewise, any one who feels sidelined by one group of producers has the option of going to another group of producers or making his or her own movies.
My friend, you have to admit that this is like saying that all businesses are open to all. Anyone who experiences bias, racism, religious discrimination, ethnic jingoism in any industry should just go and set up their own. That, to me, is a method of dodging the issue and refusing to own up to a problem. Is there a problem with systematic discrimination, or is there not? That should be the question answered. Again, keep in mind that I do not believe commercial video producers should be saddled with the burden of making sure every group feels represented in their work. I think that's a silly concept. I do find it equally silly that we just dismiss people's claims that the majority of English-language Nollywood movies are produced by Igbo marketers who systematically exclude other groups. If this were a discussion on politics, I don't think there would be any disagreement that a disproportionate amount of military leaders from northern Nigeria have led the country for most of its existence. Likewise, we probably would not disagree that Yoruba musicians are disproportionately represented among Nigerian musicians with worldwide audiences. Let's have an honest analysis about the Nigerian movie industry that's not driven by ethnic sentiment, and see if the numbers are similar.
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
#58
Good reasoning Alaaworan. The problem with us Nigerians is that we have so imbibed these persecution mentality, that it has now become impossible for us to make constructive observations about ourselves without it being read as further persecution. Even where the reasons abound to be so naturally protective of one's own, efforts should still be made to at least ensure the allegations are no more than mere allegations by giving the benefit of the doubt. Its one of the reasons why Nigeria is the way Nigeria is...we can't talk without trading blows. We can't talk...really talk.
 

chi

Well-Known Member
#59
humm ... i never knew this thread had gone that far and as usual the same old song repeated and even if the igbo's have gone tribal and so what the yoruba's would have done the same if they were at the helm of affairs. It's so easy to see the speck in someone elses eyes ....what about Mount Zion ministry that have been able to penetrate and gotten a niche in the market. how many igbo's ,delta's or other tribes have you seen appearing in their movies ???? .. hasn't it been a yoruba affair , the artiist used in those movies are their acting impeccable ..NO.. ...can we find the chiege's there YES..... is it because it's skewed towards religion and so no finger should point back.. and in the soap we have the same going on the wale adenuga plays (super story) they should not be excluded.... but i choose to overlook the tribal sentiment... yes i will say it again the yoruba's would be found guity if they had more production outfit and if they were into the english form
 

chi

Well-Known Member
#60
As far as I know, one Kenneth Nnebue decided to experiment with home video in Igbo having observed the success of the Yoruba home videos which drew from the Ogunde and Ladipo movie era. Nnebue's smash hit 'Living in Bondage' inspired other Igbo people to venture into the movie business and eventually to experiment with movies in English. So as far as I know, its been a case of some Igbo individuals getting into the movie business on their own for commercial reasons and not because Ohanaeze Ndigbo directed them to do so as revenge on Awo and the Yoruba for 1951! Likewise, I don't recall any grand assembly of Ndi'Igbo at which it was decided to popularize Nollywood 'at the detriment of professionals'.

Similarly, I don't recall anyone seriously claiming that the Igbo started Nollywood. If I recall my history and social studies classes in elementary and high school, we were taught that the movie industry in Nigeria was started by the likes of Hubert Ogunde and Duro Ladipo. I don't recall while growing up ever hearing any Igbo person complaining that the movie industry was 'dominated' by Yoruba people simply because back then the movies were in Yoruba with predominantly or all Yoruba cast. As far as I can recall, other than some Igbo people who lived in Lagos/southwest and could understand the language, most other Igbo people simply watched what was available on NTA or when VCRs came, Hollywood, Chinese or Indian movies. I don't ever recall it being an issue among Igbo people that I knew that Ogunde was awarded a national honour and acclaimed the father of Nigerian cinema for producing films which few Nigerians outside of his ethnic group had ever watched or even heard of! The man was a pioneer in African filmmaking and deserved the award on that score at least.

Growing up, I recall seeing Yoruba language home videos in the homes of my Yoruba friends and when I moved to Lagos, I saw posters for Yoruba films to be shown at the National Theatre. But I never felt that it was an issue for me that some Yoruba showbiz impresarios made movies in their language and with mostly Yoruba cast. I did not feel marginalized because the newspapers and magazines celebrated Yoruba actors and filmamkers. I usually skipped over such articles because I did not have a clue what the reporter was talking about. I did not understand Yoruba labguage so I did not take much notice of the movies or watch them unless I went to a Yoruba pal's house and there was a sub-titled version being shown. It was just not an issue at all. There was no big deal to it.

So the notion of Yoruba vs Igbo competition on 'ownership' of Nollywood is a big joke. The movie business is open to all. No one is forced to buy or watch movies which are displeasing to him or her. Likewise, any one who feels sidelined by one group of producers has the option of going to another group of producers or making his or her own movies.

Here's a funny story by way of aside. In 1990, my pals and I read a Lagos-based newspaper which proclaimed Shina Peters as best musician in Nigeria etc, etc. We could not help wondering how he received such accolades when we had never heard about him or heard his music. We knew of Sunny Ade, Ebenezer Obey, Barrister etc because we'd seen the LPs playing in our Yoruba friend's houses or at music shops. But we'd never heard of Shina Peters and here he was being proclaimed best musician in Nigeria. In later life, I came to realize that the editors of Lagos newspapers tend to assume that Nigeria begins at Apapa and ends at the tollgate on Lagos-Ibadan expressway.

Nwokem any time any day I will roll with you :)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top