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Yoruba language is dying! Do you agree?

Abike

Well-Known Member
#41
because our culture has not always embraced writing things, and keeping things....see how teachers and educators are "celebrated" as opposed to politicians, crooks, doctors, etc????




Multioption said:
That is a boost to my thesis and not the other way round. May I ask: why isn't there documentation of the lingo? remember, we are arguing the word superior!
 

OlaMichael

Well-Known Member
#42
Multioption said:
OlaM, could you give me in yoruba lingo a prose or statement with depth and import, and I shall give you at least three words or statements that have far reaching effect on the hearer/reader than Yoruba lingo?:)

A reminder: We are debating on superiority!

Igabgbo in english: Belief, Creed, Dogma, Conviction, Credo, Theism, Doxy, Canon!
Ok.... here we go.

"Abata ta kete beni pe ko b'odo tan. Odo ba gbe."

Hope you undertand that. I await your three words/statements that have a deeper import.
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#43
Pete said:
I still maintain my stance, Multi. Out of many languages that have been bastardized, English stands out. It’s so 'bad' that many English "words" aren’t even spelt or pronounced the same in different English-speaking countries.

Does that kind of “flexibility” qualify superiority?

Faith=Okwukwe=bili=binye=kwere=ntinyeobi=kwee=ntuk wasiobi=biri, and lots more I can’t remember. They’re ALL Igbo expressions – not borrowed, I believe – used in different Igbo cities for the expression "Faith".
Pete, we need to agree on a standard for our judgment before we can forge ahead in this discourse. In my response I asked for a comparison of english and any other dialect but you are muddling the subject.

English language can be compared to any other language without probing its roots.

Pete said:
Now, give me 8 different English synonyms for "Faith" and let's see if AT LEAST one isn't derived from another language! Can those words be used interchangeably with Faith without the sentence having a double meaning?
And if a particular word is derived from another lingo, does that make it less an english?
 

OlaMichael

Well-Known Member
#44
Multioption said:
Igabgbo in english: Belief, Creed, Dogma, Conviction, Credo, Theism, Doxy, Canon!
Ok...may be I should have asked you to clarify the faith you were reffering to.

But suffice to say that "faith" which means "Confident belief in the truth, value, or trustworthiness of a person, idea, or thing" is not the same as "Faith" which means "The body of dogma of a religion" e.g. the Hindu faith, Xtian Faith, Muslim Faith or "A set of principles or beliefs".

Same words....2 different meanings. So you can't mix them up like you just did up there. Remember, context often times defines the meaning of words. :)

Creed, Dogma, Credo etc reate to the 2nd one.

And by the way??? Since when did "Doxy" start to mean Faith?

Doxy in my experience, means.... 1 A female lover; a mistress. 2 A sexually promiscuous woman. 3 A woman who cohabits with an important man.


I have never heard of it meaning faith. But I stand corrected. Please give me your source. I'll be back later to expatiate on my views. In the meantime....I await your response to the yoruba statement I gave earlier. ;)
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#45
Multi, are you afraid to debate/discourse with ladies?

Cause you keep responding to the guys on this thread...well with the exception of oyinkan that is...!
 

Funmibaby

Well-Known Member
#46
Multioption said:
OlaM, the question posed to Oyinkan is just one of many valid points I am going to highlight to support my argument. However, I may be forced to stop responding if NRulers keep getting emotional without strong points to invalidate my assertion.

We don't have to guggle over non-essential. The forumite to whom the question was directed has failed to answer.... but now that you are introducing prose, communication, depth of meaning, import and impact, I wish to take you up on that!

That is a boost to my thesis and not the other way round. May I ask: why isn't there documentation of the lingo? remember, we are arguing the word superior!

OlaM, could you give me in yoruba lingo a prose or statement with depth and import, and I shall give you at least three words or statements that have far reaching effect on the hearer/reader than Yoruba lingo?:)

A reminder: We are debating on superiority!

Igabgbo in english: Belief, Creed, Dogma, Conviction, Credo, Theism, Doxy, Canon!

Aha............i see what element we have here rolleye: .
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#47
OlaMichael said:
Ok.... here we go.

"Abata ta kete beni pe ko b'odo tan. Odo ba gbe."

Hope you undertand that. I await your three words/statements that have a deeper import.
OlaM, I'm liking this debate!

It is imperative that you carry along the forumites, so they can glean from the debate.

There are three questions on the statement above:

What figure of speech is it?
What does it mean if a non-yoruba person should ask?
What's the application?


BTW: that yoruba statement should be written as "Abata ta kete bi enipe ko b'odo tan, Odo ba gbe."
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#48
Interesting! Quite an interesting take!

Let me start with the word "Doxy". I guess you quickly pulled up dictionary.com to check out the word....lol...what did you see?

A female lover; a mistress.
A sexually promiscuous woman
?

Well, Bro, FYI: Doxy means belief, and it's part of the root words that made up the word orthodoxy! I injected that to stimulate, so Doxy is not orphic! Try Thesaurus! :biggrinsa

OlaMichael said:
Ok...may be I should have asked you to clarify the faith you were reffering to.

But suffice to say that "faith" which means "Confident belief in the truth, value, or trustworthiness of a person, idea, or thing" is not the same as "Faith" which means "The body of dogma of a religion" e.g. the Hindu faith, Xtian Faith, Muslim Faith or "A set of principles or beliefs".

Same words....2 different meanings. So you can't mix them up like you just did up there. Remember, context often times defines the meaning of words. :)

Creed, Dogma, Credo etc reate to the 2nd one.

And by the way??? Since when did "Doxy" start to mean Faith?

Doxy in my experience, means.... 1 A female lover; a mistress. 2 A sexually promiscuous woman. 3 A woman who cohabits with an important man.


I have never heard of it meaning faith. But I stand corrected. Please give me your source. I'll be back later to expatiate on my views. In the meantime....I await your response to the yoruba statement I gave earlier. ;)
To the rest of your post, I shall respond, just got a call from my office that reps from my ISP are around for installation......

@Abike, I will respond to posts by Funmibaby and others...should be back online in the next few hours.

ciao!
 

Pete

Well-Known Member
#49
Multioption said:
Pete, we need to agree on a standard for our judgment before we can forge ahead in this discourse. In my response I asked for a comparison of english and any other dialect but you are muddling the subject.

English language can be compared to any other language without probing its roots.

And if a particular word is derived from another lingo, does that make it less an english?
For English to be "superior", it has to stay original, have words that cannot be misunderstood or taken out of context. Logically, anything without roots will either fade away or remain inconsistent, just like English, and THAT does not qualify superiority. Maybe you would have to state your reasons clearly, Multi?

Now, let's consider the synonyms you used for "Faith":

Faith comes from old French “feid” which means “trust, belief”.

Creed is the new English word for the old English word “creda” which comes from the Latin word “Credo”, which means “I believe”.

Dogma is the Latin word for philosophical tenet, comes from the Greek word “dogmatos”.

Conviction comes from the Latin word “convictus”.

Theism comes from deism (1682), from the French word "déisme"; from Latin: deus "god." Until c.1700, opposed to atheism, in a sense where we would now use theism.

Canon comes from the Greek word “kanon”, from “kanonikos”. Taken in ecclesiastical sense for "decree of the Church.

Tell me, how can a leaf be superior to the root? Latin is not dead yet, neither is Greek. Ah, I’m loving this! Multi, what are your points?
 

OlaMichael

Well-Known Member
#51
Multioption said:
OlaM, I'm liking this debate!

Keep in mind that it is imperative that you carry along the forumites, so they can glean from the debate.

There are two questions on the statement above:

What figure of speech is it?
What does it mean if a non-yoruba person should ask?
What's the application?


BTW: that yoruba statement should be written as "Abata ta kete bi enipe ko b'odo tan, Odo ba gbe."
Erm...Multi...if the other forumites ask for the meaning we'll tell them. But till then, you just tell me your 3 words or statements that have or carry more import than the statement.

I await your response. :)
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#53
I didnt even see this before I posted my bit about parents forbidding their children to speak english in the house!!!! as harsh or crude the article might appear, perhaps a second read will shed real light on what the author is trying to say! instead of us disecting english nouns and proverbs here...ish!





"The greatest tragedy in Yorubaland today however regarding language is the dominating trend to speak only English to their children, making it their first language, then sending them to private nursery school, who only teach in English and causing Yoruba children to value English above all other languages! (After all their WAEC will not be in Yoruba, one highly-educated Yoruba man told me!) And see the result! These English-speaking children will rudely use English to disrespect all and sundry (after all English does not have pronouns of respect for anybody). Hear them saying "Shut up Daddy! - Give me back my candy!" in an authoritative way"
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#54
Crystalgirl said:
Why isn't this in Gen. discussion, it'll make for an excellent topic esp. the way MultiO is going ;)

OlaM, na Asian girls I dey see for your avater? Abacha go kill you today! Make I go do my own...
No I won't, cos I'm after Chinese babes currently. :biggrinsa
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#55
vince said:
Everything western is superior,multi!And that includes their religion/s too.No wonder we're sliding backward in everything that partakes to human developement,and the rest of the world sees us as LOOSERS!
BTW,our leaders also love to shift all our money into their banks,because of better security.Do i hear the world chanting LOOSERS!!LOOSERS!!LOOSERS!!LOOSERS!! :rolleyes:
scare: :laugh: bgrin:
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#56
OlaMichael said:
Yes o....that na me. Only there for a likkle while though. But em...whish "asiri" come "tu" now??? :spiny:

CrystalGirl.....Sharrap already!!! :rolleyes: And don't you go stirring things up with GSA. Those na my 2 Chinese wives that I got after my 7 hour ordeal in China. At least something good came out of it. :) :roll
:sport-smi For obtaining Chinese wives without my permission.
You better send them over to me for 'sampling' so I can decide whether or not they are good enough for you.
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#57
Pete said:
For English to be "superior", it has to stay original, have words that cannot be misunderstood or taken out of context. Logically, anything without roots will either fade away or remain inconsistent, just like English, and THAT does not qualify superiority. Maybe you would have to state your reasons clearly, Multi?

Now, let's consider the synonyms you used for "Faith":

Faith comes from old French “feid” which means “trust, belief”.

Creed is the new English word for the old English word “creda” which comes from the Latin word “Credo”, which means “I believe”.

Dogma is the Latin word for philosophical tenet, comes from the Greek word “dogmatos”.

Conviction comes from the Latin word “convictus”.

Theism comes from deism (1682), from the French word "déisme"; from Latin: deus "god." Until c.1700, opposed to atheism, in a sense where we would now use theism.

Canon comes from the Greek word “kanon”, from “kanonikos”. Taken in ecclesiastical sense for "decree of the Church.

Tell me, how can a leaf be superior to the root? Latin is not dead yet, neither is Greek. Ah, I’m loving this! Multi, what are your points?
Pete, the words listed in your post remain english words; arent' they?
 

Pete

Well-Known Member
#59
Multioption said:
Pete, the words listed in your post remain english words; arent' they?
Which words: the synonyms you used or the alphabets I used for the Igbo expression? Pardon me; I tend to read beyond meanings sometimes, which could lead to going off track. Even the English alphabets have changed and increased over the years; most of them originated from older languages. You used borrowed synonyms, unlike our ingenuous languages that tend to stick with one original local word per expression (unless it gets real hard), than borrow a “foreign” word to add to the original. If we (speaking mostly for the Igbo’s) have to add a word, then it'll be original, well... formal-wise, that is. On the other hand, mixing indigenous languages with any other language (or using foreign alphabets) doesn't necessarily make the "lender" superior, not when the lender is a borrower too; in which case, the words/alphabets we’re borrowing might not even be originally English.

Multi, don’t try to get me contradict myself or blow blunders. For me, many words mean higher caution. :spiny:
 
#60
Make I join the roforofo o :sport-smi :)

@Multi, I totally disagree with you. English superior to whaaat! What a crock!I do not know too many languages, but yoruba is deep, poetic, lyrical, beautiful!

Have you ever wanted to translate something from English to yoruba but as you did so, the meaning was completely lost? No way can you start to compare english to yoruba. Have you ever heard sunny Ade praising somebodi in that fantastic language? Ya head never swell? How can you even begin to compare the dry, functional, boring language that is english to the beautiful peotry of yoruba? Oga, I go vex for una o.
Its like comparing a 504 to a mercedes na. The fact that they both carry you to ya destination does not in any way mean that the driving experience is the same. I love the yoruba language. Its the same way I have heard bible scholars describing original hebrew and greek. They wail that there is just no way you can really enjoy the bible, particularly books like psalms and songs of solomon in English, you lose too much of the beauty, the prose, the ahhhhh!

Oga multi, I respect una o, but dis ya talk get k leg. Make I no vex for una o.

As for all of una people wey ansa am, OlaM, dis ya afata, e get as e be o, you sef don join the players? Dis ya playing na international o!
Abiks, se Pa J don eat today?
Funmi , oloruko mi, ku ise o.
Oga Pete, na true u dey tok o. How english go come compare to any of our beautiful languages?

Abacha, na you biko!

Work dey call my name ojare, but Multi's comment pulled me out of hibernation. How im go tok dat kin tin? Ehn? rolleye: