Yoruba language is dying! Do you agree?

Funmibaby

Well-Known Member
#81
Gen Sani Abacha said:
By development, I'm talking about functional development in usage domains. For instance you can't obtain a degree in Chemistry, Biology, Computer Science, Economics, Engineeering, Aeronautics etc via the Yoruba langauge. You can't learn to fly an aeroplane, navigate a ship or space shuttle using entirely the Yoruba languge. We still need to adapt/develop the language to include these fields of endeavour/knowledge. This doesn't make Yoruba inferior, but it does mean the langauge hasn't been developed to include those fields just yet! I myself have been part of the efforts to adapt/adopt/create terms to bring the world, wide web and Computer Science as a field of endeavour into the Yoruba language, so I know what I am talking about.

ciao

i understand what you mean but when considering Yoruba you have to understand that in the areas where this language does thrive, Aeronautics and the like aren't important parts of the local society. And also more importantly, a Yoruba degree in Aeronautics would mean you can only work in Southwestern Nigeria and Southeastern Benin. That's it. Whereas in Italy, you can work in the ENTIRE country with a degree like that. The language hasn't developed on those terms because it's highly unnecessary. That's like finding a Yoruba word for snow or icicles. It doesn't make the language less developed.
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#82
GSA,

Thanks for the essay; that is what I look for in debates. However, my judgment is based on facts collated via observations. Maybe in the future yoruba language will command worldwide recognition as you assert.
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#83
OlaMichael said:
How??? You asked me to give you a sentence filled with import so you can give me 3 words/statements in english that surpass it......then I provide one....and then you default on your end of things...and then you say to me "an escape route"?? :confused: That one beats me. Men....abeg go siddon!! What does it matter what it is??? Figure of speech....adage....warning??etc... At least you understood it.... Provide words that carry the same import...you tell me about me looking for an escape route. Please methinks you're the on looking for an escape route o. :)

Anyways, so as not to provide you with a means of escape. It is a proverb. Translating it literally inton english will make it lose it's meaning.... but basically it means "The riverbanks/marsh stands proud like it's not dependent on the river, then the river dries up".

Oya ...let's have your 3 words..... :rolleyes:
OlaM, I'm not seeking an escape route! I engage in debates to edify, otherwise, I keep my fingers crossed. The strength of a word or statement lies in its meaning, so telling what your proverb implies will help.
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#85
Multioption said:
GSA,

Thanks for the essay; that is what I look for in debates. However, my judgment is based on facts collated via observations. Maybe in the future yoruba language will command worldwide recognition as you assert.
Actually Multi Yoruba already commands worldwide recognition, not on the level of English though. In places like Cuba and Brazil, some people of African descent still worship Orisha, and they employ the Yoruba language to do it. In places like the USA and UK, many universities offer Yoruba studies courses, because they consider to be a langauge that has security and economic ramifications for them. This is due not only due to their large resident Yoruba populations, but also because of their economic interests in Nigeria! The USA considers 30 major African languages as crucial to their interests, Yoruba being one of them. So far now, maybe we'll have to agree to disagree.

ciao
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#87
OlaMichael said:
You do have a point there. More dynamic and developed? Yes I agree. superior? Mba. No way...sam sam. Yoruba is very powerful and lyrical. With 1 or 2 adages....in yoruba...an entire village will understand an entirely unknown story/scenario/picture. Such is the power and magnificence of the language that when praise in this language is employed....your whole being just kinda responds to the adulation etc.

I do agree though that it is not as developed as English language. But that goes back to what Abike said earlier. Could it be because no one bothers to keep records of words??? Cos I am sure there probably words that describe those elements that will allow you to effectively fly and aeroplane etc.
Noted dawg. :)
 

OlaMichael

Well-Known Member
#88
Multioption said:
OlaM, I'm not seeking an escape route! I engage in debates to edify, otherwise, I keep my fingers crossed. The strength of a word or statement lies in its meaning, so telling what your proverb implies will help.
Multi...but I just gave you the meaning!!! :) Or did you not read my entire response to you???

Hmmmm....me thinks you're dodging o. First supply statement, I did...then provide meaning....I did....yet you're stalling.... Oh well. :spiny:
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#89
My line of thought:

Gen Sani Abacha said:
By development, I'm talking about functional development in usage domains. For instance you can't obtain a degree in Chemistry, Biology, Computer Science, Economics, Engineeering, Aeronautics etc via the Yoruba langauge.
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#90
Funmibaby said:
i understand what you mean but when considering Yoruba you have to understand that in the areas where this language does thrive, Aeronautics and the like aren't important parts of the local society. And also more importantly, a Yoruba degree in Aeronautics would mean you can only work in Southwestern Nigeria and Southeastern Benin. That's it. Whereas in Italy, you can work in the ENTIRE country with a degree like that. The language hasn't developed on those terms because it's highly unnecessary. That's like finding a Yoruba word for snow or icicles. It doesn't make the language less developed.
I still say it does, cos we're not including it in all fields of endeavour which are relevant to us. Do you consider it unneccessary to have your motor vehicle booklet/manual in a bilingual Yoruba-English version ? Or your TV set, Radio, Fridge, etc ? All these modern appliances are in use all over Yorubaland, and not everyone can read the English labels/instructions. There was a case were a monolingual Yoruba woman gave her own infant daughter Dettol to drink cos she couldn't read the label, she thought she was administering some childrens anti-malaria syrup, the child died in the end. This was a needless tragedy that could have been avoided with effective labelling.(It happened when I was a could though, and it was in my home town). I s'pose we are gonna hafta agree to disagree like I told Multi. :)

ciao
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#91
OlaMichael said:
Multi...but I just gave you the meaning!!! :) Or did you not read my entire response to you???

Hmmmm....me thinks you're dodging o. First supply statement, I did...then provide meaning....I did....yet you're stalling.... Oh well. :spiny:
OlaM, the statement must have a meaning. You did nothing but attempt to translate.
 

OlaMichael

Well-Known Member
#92
Multioption said:
OlaM, the statement must have a meaning. You did nothing but attempt to translate.
Multi....wetin be the problem now...??? Why does it matter to you so much for me to explain when you already know the meaning? Abi no be you correct me (even though I was right too) earlier....saying that it should have been written in a particular way????

But to play to your tune for a while... Even though I already told you the meaning.

It means... That the MarshLand next to the river because it's budding and flourishing with green leaves and flowers stands proud like it's source is not the river. So instead of "paying homage" to/"acknowledging" the river as it's source it acting proud like the green leaves it was producing were entirely its handiwork. Then the river dries up and of course....so does the green leaves, flowers etc. It means "for one to acknowledge one's source/roots".

Now will you respond to my quote? "Abata ta kete b'eni pe ko b'odo tan, Odo ba gbe". :) Will you provide 3 words/statements that carry more import than the adage? r do I still have further expositions/explanations to give??? lol :spin2:
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#93
OlaMichael said:
Multi....wetin be the problem now...??? Why does it matter to you so much for me to explain when you already know the meaning? Abi no be you correct me (even though I was right too) earlier....saying that it should have been written in a particular way????

But to play to your tune for a while... Even though I already told you the meaning.

It means... That the MarshLand next to the river because it's budding and flourishing with green leaves and flowers stands proud like it's source is not the river. So instead of "paying homage" to/"acknowledging" the river as it's source it acting proud like the green leaves it was producing were entirely its handiwork. Then the river dries up and of course....so does the green leaves, flowers etc. It means "for one to acknowledge one's source/roots".

Now will you respond to my quote? "Abata ta kete b'eni pe ko b'odo tan, Odo ba gbe". :) Will you provide 3 words/statements that carry more import than the adage? r do I still have further expositions/explanations to give??? lol :spin2:
OlaM, your response got me giggling. The problem in our discourse is lack of technical orientation on certain things.....I asked for the meaning of your proverb, instead you attempted to translate; they are not the same! The beauty of English language is that there is no prose, proverb, or saying without a meaning. The yoruba proverb is aimed at doing something, what is it?

So far, the proverb is meaningless.
 
#95
Good day Mr. owner, thread opener, Chairman sir, accurate time keeper, my co- debaters and my fellow argumentum NR members, I am here to support the motion which says......... Yoruba is still gbam forever (till God's kingdom come).

First, the community is the teacher of the language and also the school. Some of the parents are to be blamed for not teaching their infant how to speak their own native language. For example, we are required to speak English in School, but not required to speak English in the house. living with my granny; we speak English and pure Yoruba... not my dialect cause we found it so hard to learn.

Second, “kilo happen etc… they are mixture of languages, since Yoruba cannot be decoded to English, English can be decoded to Yoruba. Yoruba use “e” for elders, it means “they” in English. So the mixture of the 2 languages got to come in.

Third, I have typed arrant nonsense there, I am short of words

In conclusion, Oyinbo re pete, dem don blow my head........... gbese re pete.
 

OlaMichael

Well-Known Member
#96
Multioption said:
OlaM, your response got me giggling. The problem in our discourse is lack of technical orientation on certain things.....I asked for the meaning of your proverb, instead you attempted to translate; they are not the same! The beauty of English language is that there is no prose, proverb, or saying without a meaning. The yoruba proverb is aimed at doing something, what is it?

So far, the proverb is meaningless.
Multi...the "ojogbon" Multi. I think I get your stance and point. And I will leave you to ur denial. But b4 I do so....let it be known that i did tell you what the proverb meant....even though I suspect you know it already. At least I know next time not to bother engaging you in a discussion.....as you'll probably turn a blind eye to the obvious and claim that the obvious is not known. :roll

Read my response and u'll c where I clearly wrote..."It means '"for one to acknowledge one's source/roots"' ". The proverb is self explanatory...but because u don't have a viable response....u chose to go the denial path.

One of the greatest qualities of a strong man...is the ability for that man to put his hands up when he is wrong....and say ok I missed it then. Not to blindly dodge an issue...which sadly my dear friend....u're doing now. :) I have done everything you originally asked for and even more....and yet you keep stalling. Hmmm....more grease to your elbow.

Even if I fail to provide the meaning...at least from my "attempt at translating" a man of your understanding and intellect should be able to derive one from it...abi no be so??? But oh well....let's agree to disagree on this one. Me I dey go hibernate again...i think. :biggrinsa

Be well. :)
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#97
OlaMichael said:
Multi...the "ojogbon" Multi. I think I get your stance and point. And I will leave you to ur denial. But b4 I do so....let it be known that i did tell you what the proverb meant....even though I suspect you know it already. At least I know next time not to bother engaging you in a discussion.....as you'll probably turn a blind eye to the obvious and claim that the obvious is not known. :roll

Read my response and u'll c where I clearly wrote..."It means '"for one to acknowledge one's source/roots"' ". The proverb is self explanatory...but because u don't have a viable response....u chose to go the denial path.

One of the greatest qualities of a strong man...is the ability for that man to put his hands up when he is wrong....and say ok I missed it then. Not to blindly dodge an issue...which sadly my dear friend....u're doing now. :) I have done everything you originally asked for and even more....and yet you keep stalling. Hmmm....more grease to your elbow.

Even if I fail to provide the meaning...at least from my "attempt at translating" a man of your understanding and intellect should be able to derive one from it...abi no be so??? But oh well....let's agree to disagree on this one. Me I dey go hibernate again...i think. :biggrinsa

Be well. :)
OlaM, your response was envisaged so I decided to wait peradventure you would come online (12.52am in Nigeria) Your proverb cannot withstand the drills of language, not in any parlance; this I recognized, hence the probe for its meaning. Inference can not help in a discourse of this sort, direct statement must have meanings that your debater can understand for proper response.

Your assumption that I understand the proverb was wrong, although the sentence was adjusted to avoid having to deal with two hypothesis...I guess you didn't catch my reason for doing that.

Perhaps if you had said: Odo to ba gbagbe orisun re, gbigbe ni yo gbe, I could have responded!

My response: It is meaningless! All statements must be validated before corresponding sentences in english are provided; what are idioms for! Many yoruba sentences cannot pass that test!
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
#98
An example to corroborate my stance:

Yoruba version: Omokunrin na ti ta teru n pa

English version: The man kicked the bucket

I hope that helps set your thought in right direction.
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
#99
olatoludipe said:
Good day Mr. owner, thread opener, Chairman sir, accurate time keeper, my co- debaters and my fellow argumentum NR members, I am here to support the motion which says......... Yoruba is still gbam forever (till God's kingdom come).

First, the community is the teacher of the language and also the school. Some of the parents are to be blamed for not teaching their infant how to speak their own native language. For example, we are required to speak English in School, but not required to speak English in the house. living with my granny; we speak English and pure Yoruba... not my dialect cause we found it so hard to learn.

Second, “kilo happen etc… they are mixture of languages, since Yoruba cannot be decoded to English, English can be decoded to Yoruba. Yoruba use “e” for elders, it means “they” in English. So the mixture of the 2 languages got to come in.

Third, I have typed arrant nonsense there, I am short of words

In conclusion, Oyinbo re pete, dem don blow my head........... gbese re pete.
:laugh:
Stoooooooooooooooooooop Miss perfect speaker. Alaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaas, don't you know that the Lady Chairman has disoriented the bombastic, iconoclastic, caustic undertones of the signitary signifyer of the event horizon nomenclature! :D
 
Gen Sani Abacha said:
:laugh:
Stoooooooooooooooooooop Miss perfect speaker. Alaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaas, don't you know that the Lady Chairman has disoriented the bombastic, iconoclastic, caustic undertones of the signitary signifyer of the event horizon nomenclature! :D

:gnash scare: Your honorable sir, I am having headache, although they are big grammars. Anyway, when you were still alive, your grammar wasn't as good as this.

I have said my own and SO HELEP ME LORD. :)
 
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