Yoruba language is dying! Do you agree?

Oyinkan

Well-Known Member
Funmibaby said:
I will say it again here vince. Yoruba is neither dead nor dying. It is alive and thriving. Yoruba as a language can be traced back further than english can. It is extensive. In terms of evolution, u can easily look to the different dialects of yoruba existent today. "develop the language to fit modern times"???? I don't think you understand how extensive the language already is.
say it gurl
 

Oyinkan

Well-Known Member
OlaMichael said:
Ok.... here we go.

"Abata ta kete beni pe ko b'odo tan. Odo ba gbe."

Hope you undertand that. I await your three words/statements that have a deeper import.
yoruba is so deep
anti abike how una dey?
 

vince

Well-Known Member
English is like a virus,it needs to infect other more sophisticated languages to survive,and it does it very well,better than any other language.Think about uncountable words from french,greek,latin and other ancient lingos.That is the secret of it's success,not to talk of a lot of help from hollywood,US music,and IT world.
If we're basing it's superiority on it's ability to adapt to any era,it's flexibility,then it is unbeatable.
Yoruba needs to adapt,it needs to be more flexible,and most of all we yorubas need to support it and stop running away from it,only to come in front of our compurras and proclaim fake undying love for it,while it slowly dies off.
 

Multioption

Well-Known Member
Vince said:
English is like a virus,it needs to infect other more sophisticated languages to survive,and it does it very well,better than any other language.Think about uncountable words from french,greek,latin and other ancient lingos.That is the secret of it's success,not to talk of a lot of help from hollywood,US music,and IT world.
If we're basing it's superiority on it's ability to adapt to any era,it's flexibility,then it is unbeatable.
Yoruba needs to adapt,it needs to be more flexible,and most of all we yorubas need to support it and stop running away from it,only to come in front of our compurras and proclaim fake undying love for it,while it slowly dies off.
Wise saying! Disputants, more often than not, hardly think of premises before airing their views, so when light starts beaming and depth summons....enuff said!
 

bluestocking

Well-Known Member
Multioption said:
OlaM, your response was envisaged so I decided to wait peradventure you would come online (12.52am in Nigeria) Your proverb cannot withstand the drills of language, not in any parlance; this I recognized, hence the probe for its meaning. Inference can not help in a discourse of this sort, direct statement must have meanings that your debater can understand for proper response.

Your assumption that I understand the proverb was wrong, although the sentence was adjusted to avoid having to deal with two hypothesis...I guess you didn't catch my reason for doing that.

Perhaps if you had said: Odo to ba gbagbe orisun re, gbigbe ni yo gbe, I could have responded!

My response: It is meaningless! All statements must be validated before corresponding sentences in english are provided; what are idioms for! Many yoruba sentences cannot pass that test!
Kwik kweshion Multioption, is this how you talk in real life? or in your everyday life? You know you dont have to always sound like u're writing a thesis before u make sense :eyes
 

Funmibaby

Well-Known Member
vince said:
English is like a virus,it needs to infect other more sophisticated languages to survive,and it does it very well,better than any other language.Think about uncountable words from french,greek,latin and other ancient lingos.That is the secret of it's success,not to talk of a lot of help from hollywood,US music,and IT world.
If we're basing it's superiority on it's ability to adapt to any era,it's flexibility,then it is unbeatable.Yoruba needs to adapt,it needs to be more flexible,and most of all we yorubas need to support it and stop running away from it,only to come in front of our compurras and proclaim fake undying love for it,while it slowly dies off.

Vince please STOP IT................jeez. You just like making sweeping statements abi?

1. adapt to any era?????? Yoruba has been around LONG before modern english was developed so what are you really talking about? I can personally trace my family heritage to the 1500s and I KNOW they were speaking Yoruba. The Ijebus (which is a dialect of Yoruba) were speaking their language in NIGERIA far back into the 1100s. Don't speak about a language that is not flexible, or adaptable to any era. What has it been doing since???? We have words for radio, tv, computer, pen, grinder, car - all things i KNOW werent being used in 1000s. Even Yorubanglish as spoken in Lagos is evidence of the continual evolution of this language. Go to Benin, Brazil, Haiti, heck even Louisiana and learn about the adaptability and flexibility of the Yoruba language

2. perhaps YOU and many others like YOU are running away from it. I know that for most of the little villages in Ogun, Osun, Ekiti, Ondo, Oyo et al still speak Yoruba proudly and fluently. Have you travelled vastly in Oyo? Yoruba thrives my brother. It is NOT dying.
 

Funmibaby

Well-Known Member
bluestocking said:
Kwik kweshion Multioption, is this how you talk in real life? or in your everyday life? You know you dont have to always sound like u're writing a thesis before u make sense :eyes

bluestocking, sometimes people talk like that when they are trying to disguise the fact that they are really not making any sense.
 
Now you can search Google in this dying language

Gen Sani Abacha said:
Actually Multi Yoruba already commands worldwide recognition, not on the level of English though. In places like Cuba and Brazil, some people of African descent still worship Orisha, and they employ the Yoruba language to do it. In places like the USA and UK, many universities offer Yoruba studies courses, because they consider to be a langauge that has security and economic ramifications for them. This is due not only due to their large resident Yoruba populations, but also because of their economic interests in Nigeria! The USA considers 30 major African languages as crucial to their interests, Yoruba being one of them. So far now, maybe we'll have to agree to disagree.

ciao

I thought I would post this link to support the assertions of our General himself :D : http://www.google.com/intl/yo/. Now if an international technology company like Google considers it important enough to translate their home page, trademark information etc. fully into Yoruba, I'd guess that it suggests great things for the survival and extension of the language (and other African first languages) as a medium of communication and instruction. (To be fair, Google is also available in Latin). There have been United Nations studies done on the superiority--since we're using that word--of mother-tongue education, and I believe it was an OAU/Ife study that demonstrated the effectiveness of mother-tongue education for technical subjects and even second-language learning (i.e. French, English).
 
Gen Sani Abacha said:
By development, I'm talking about functional development in usage domains. For instance you can't obtain a degree in Chemistry, Biology, Computer Science, Economics, Engineeering, Aeronautics etc via the Yoruba langauge. You can't learn to fly an aeroplane, navigate a ship or space shuttle using entirely the Yoruba languge. We still need to adapt/develop the language to include these fields of endeavour/knowledge. This doesn't make Yoruba inferior, but it does mean the langauge hasn't been developed to include those fields just yet! I myself have been part of the efforts to adapt/adopt/create terms to bring the world, wide web and Computer Science as a field of endeavour into the Yoruba language, so I know what I am talking about.

ciao
My dearest GSA luxlove:
You have proven yourself to be very knowledgeable in this very entertaining discourse. You are trying to rescue Multi by saying the the language is not inferior, just underdeveloped. And that we need to start using it as a language of instruction. Well, it all sounds nice, dandy and patriotic on paper, but I have been around academics for a looooong time, going to be one meself, :) and I need to tell you that your proposition is not feasible. Can you imagine going to the University of Ibadan and learning your physics in yoruba? How do you even begin to transfer this information to University of Maiduguri, or even to Nsukka? Is it even possible?

Do you know that most universities in Europe that have any kind of international student body have started to mandate that the language of instruction be english? Because they have started to realise that 1) their students suffer in the world economic order if they cannot speak english, and 2) they also want the money from international students who panic at having to learn another language.

If we tried to enforce instruction even at the primary school level in local languages, I believe we would set our educational system back another 100 years, if it was possible to make it any more backward than it already is. So what do you suggest, that each state university teach in the dominant language of their area : Igbo in Igboland, Hausa in the north, efik in calabar? Would that not lead to total chaos?

People should learn to read and write in their local languages. They should be able to speak it fluently. But going to pilot school in yoruba? Physics in yoruba? mathematics in yoruba? can you even begin to fathom that? We can't even teach the darned subjects in english proficiently! Ain't practical. We have to accept the fact that our region is not important enough to make our languages important in the worldwide scheme of things. Its not about inferiority or not of the languages. Its just an economic reality. So we speak the languages that can get us ahead in the world pending the time when our regions gain any kind of economic importance! (well, that's why we are praying abi?)

ciao!
 
funmo said:
My dearest GSA luxlove:
You have proven yourself to be very knowledgeable in this very entertaining discourse. You are trying to rescue Multi by saying the the language is not inferior, just underdeveloped. And that we need to start using it as a language of instruction. Well, it all sounds nice, dandy and patriotic on paper, but I have been around academics for a looooong time, going to be one meself, :) and I need to tell you that your proposition is not feasible. Can you imagine going to the University of Ibadan and learning your physics in yoruba? How do you even begin to transfer this information to University of Maiduguri, or even to Nsukka? Is it even possible?

Do you know that most universities in Europe that have any kind of international student body have started to mandate that the language of instruction be english? Because they have started to realise that 1) their students suffer in the world economic order if they cannot speak english, and 2) they also want the money from international students who panic at having to learn another language.

If we tried to enforce instruction even at the primary school level in local languages, I believe we would set our educational system back another 100 years, if it was possible to make it any more backward than it already is. So what do you suggest, that each state university teach in the dominant language of their area : Igbo in Igboland, Hausa in the north, efik in calabar? Would that not lead to total chaos?

People should learn to read and write in their local languages. They should be able to speak it fluently. But going to pilot school in yoruba? Physics in yoruba? mathematics in yoruba? can you even begin to fathom that? We can't even teach the darned subjects in english proficiently! Ain't practical. We have to accept the fact that our region is not important enough to make our languages important in the worldwide scheme of things. Its not about inferiority or not of the languages. Its just an economic reality. So we speak the languages that can get us ahead in the world pending the time when our regions gain any kind of economic importance! (well, that's why we are praying abi?)

ciao!
My dearest funmo babes luxlove: while I concede that you do have some points, I still insist on the development of our own langauges. I would take a bi-lingual approach with both mother tongue and English being Compulsory. I would stipulate(just like the Egypt under President Nasser) that all university graduates should produce mother tongue copies of their Projects(whether undergrad or postgrad) in every/any field of endeavour. I will not countenance any moves to neglect/hinder the development of our languages. Indeed, if I were at the head of a Military Government, I would promulgate a decree making it a treasonable felony to rubbish any of our nlanguages, any attempt to hinder/hamper our language development would result in a fine or imprisonment with 're-education' for the offender. Any Nigerian born abroad who can't speak Nigerian language, would not be given Nigerian citizenship, the same would apply to non-Nigerian spouses of Nigerians! I know it's pretty drastic, but that's the way I've see these things, and won't be changing any time soon. That's why I wouldn't settle down with a woman who can't speak my language either. :biggrinsa

Out of curiousity if you don't mind my asking, what field of study are you in as an academic ?

Keep kool darling, luving ya still. :)
 

OlaMichael

Well-Known Member
BrandNaijan said:
I thought I would post this link to support the assertions of our General himself :D : http://www.google.com/intl/yo/. Now if an international technology company like Google considers it important enough to translate their home page, trademark information etc. fully into Yoruba, I'd guess that it suggests great things for the survival and extension of the language (and other African first languages) as a medium of communication and instruction. (To be fair, Google is also available in Latin). There have been United Nations studies done on the superiority--since we're using that word--of mother-tongue education, and I believe it was an OAU/Ife study that demonstrated the effectiveness of mother-tongue education for technical subjects and even second-language learning (i.e. French, English).
Hey Alaaworan! Longest time! Missed you and glad to see you back.

By the way, why did you drop "Alaaworan"? Did you forget your password? :D Anyways, glad to have you back in the fold. ;)
 
OlaMichael said:
Funmo....how now? Longest time! I've missed you actually. Oh well....we've all been hibernating I guess and it takes an interesting topic like this to pull us out. ;) Nice response. I was actually waiting for Multi...and still waiting for him to finish before taking him down the line u've started to take...The bobo is already stalling sef.

As per my avatar, na so I c am o...this na the chines lady I bought stuff from when I last China. I told her sha that she and her sister be my chinese wives....abi? lol

It's funny that Multi thinks english language is "Superior" to yoruba one just based on the fact that he reckons (at least so it seems) that english has more words that mean the same thing.and yoruba doesn't. Hmmmm...I am so hoping that my understanding of his post is wrong o....cos men... :biggrinsa

Oga, you go china? Na world player you be? Make una dey show dat ya face from time to time o. As for me, the work wey I dey face this few days, na the grace of GOD o, na so I tok say make I remove hand for internet small small, before yawa come gas!! :spiny:
By d way, how you come take know that dat man na Alaaworan abi wetin you call am? You be winsh?
 
Gen Sani Abacha said:
My dearest funmo babes luxlove: while I concede that you do have some points, I still insist on the development of our own langauges. I would take a bi-lingual approach with both mother tongue and English being Compulsory. I would stipulate(just like the Egypt under President Nasser) that all university graduates should produce mother tongue copies of their Projects(whether undergrad or postgrad) in every/any field of endeavour. I will not countenance any moves to neglect/hinder the development of our languages. Indeed, if I were at the head of a Military Government, I would promulgate a decree making it a treasonable felony to rubbish any of our nlanguages, any attempt to hinder/hamper our language development would result in a fine or imprisonment with 're-education' for the offender. Any Nigerian born abroad who can't speak Nigerian language, would not be given Nigerian citizenship, the same would apply to non-Nigerian spouses of Nigerians! I know it's pretty drastic, but that's the way I've see these things, and won't be changing any time soon. That's why I wouldn't settle down with a woman who can't speak my language either. :biggrinsa

Out of curiousity if you don't mind my asking, what field of study are you in as an academic ?
Keep kool darling, luving ya still. :)

My favourite dictator,
That would be telling wouldn't it? Part of the reason you adore me so much ;) is because I am alluring and mysterious, abi? Why spoil a wonderful thing with too much information? Luvving ya toooooo! luxlove:
 
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