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Yoruba pioneered films on screen and video in Nigeria

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N

noone

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Ahhh...you've taken the argument to the very foundation on which some of these prejudices exist......but again I ask..what does the dislike/distrust or interpreted tribal bias in film have anything to do with the crappy quality of films that are being produced everyday across board???..we can go round and round in circles and leave out the root causes bcos of this tribal argument..next year when someone else whinges we will have this same argument and nothing would have moved an inch forward in 365 days post this thread!

Dat is my closing statement.smokin:
Answer - Nothing, absolutely nothing! But I had already addressed that before. I was just trying to point out to Peaches that the issue of discrimination and tribalism has existed hitherto in the very fabric of our Nation, way before Nollywood so it should be expected that it would permeate into Nollywood.

Be that as it may, I also pointed out that although the Yorubas pioneered the movie industry in Nigeria, (which is the basis of this post), where does that leave us? Shouldn't we move on and work on improving the craft regardless of where we come from?

And even if we don't want to work together, can't we, in our 'little trbal camps' bring out quality films that we all can be proud of?

So, yes, the Yorubas pioneered the film industry; however another set of people exposed it to the world. Now is the time for the next set to move it on from mediocrity to excellence and that is my closing statement!smokin:

(Kikis, hope you don't mind me tiefing your line but it sounds cool, okw'ighota?)
 

KikisMuffin

I no get ya time!!
Answer - Nothing, absolutely nothing! But I had already addressed that before. I was just trying to point out to Peaches that the issue of discrimination and tribalism has existed hitherto in the very fabric of our Nation, way before Nollywood so it should be expected that it would permeate into Nollywood.

Be that as it may, I also pointed out that although the Yorubas pioneered the movie industry in Nigeria, (which is the basis of this post), where does that leave us? Shouldn't we move on and work on improving the craft regardless of where we come from?

And even if we don't want to work together, can't we, in our 'little trbal camps' bring out quality films that we all can be proud of?

So, yes, the Yorubas pioneered the film industry; however another set of people exposed it to the world. Now is the time for the next set to move it on from mediocrity to excellence and that is my closing statement!smokin:

(Kikis, hope you don't mind me tiefing your line but it sounds cool, okw'ighota?)
ANd dat (@ bolded) is a benefitting closing statement.....grinning:
 

grafikdon

Well-Known Member
Now is the time for the next set to move it on from mediocrity to excellence and that is my closing statement!smokin:
GBAM!!!!! I love that line...pretty much what we should be aiming for right now! Let's make people watch our movies because they are hot!!! Not because they want to 'feel' home or simply because they just want to watch something made by their people...patriotism that is...


On a side note NO! Nigeria is not breaking apart! We had our chance 40 yrs ago but instead we all fought for the 'unity' of Nigeria... anyone who tries to break Naija go hear nwii... weda na Hausa o, Igbo o, youruba o, Asari Dokubo o, MEND o... una go see una neck without mirror... It's one Nigeria by fair or foul. No be me tok am, na so e be grinning:

Our best bet is to stop all these despicable ('dethshpikable' in Daffy accent)ethnic prejudice and move forward! Have you ever observed how unique and unbeatable Naija's can be when John Nwachukwu, Essien Uduak, Kayode Falana, Ali Kafanchan and Omorodion join hands together and actually work as Nigerians? Oh it sure feels good...it feels so good you'd think your spirit'd sail into the worlds beyond the perceptive capacity of the human eyes. grinning:
 
Ahhh...you've taken the argument to the very foundation on which some of these prejudices exist......but again I ask..what does the dislike/distrust or interpreted tribal bias in film have anything to do with the crappy quality of films that are being produced everyday across board???..we can go round and round in circles and leave out the root causes bcos of this tribal argument..next year when someone else whinges we will have this same argument and nothing would have moved an inch forward in 365 days post this thread!

Dat is my closing statement.smokin:
And that ISN'T your closing statement!
 
GBAM!!!!! I love that line...pretty much what we should be aiming for right now! Let's make people watch our movies because they are hot!!! Not because they want to 'feel' home or simply because they just want to watch something made by their people...patriotism that is...


On a side note NO! Nigeria is not breaking apart! We had our chance 40 yrs ago but instead we all fought for the 'unity' of Nigeria... anyone who tries to break Naija go hear nwii... weda na Hausa o, Igbo o, youruba o, Asari Dokubo o, MEND o... una go see una neck without mirror... It's one Nigeria by fair or foul. No be me tok am, na so e be grinning:

Our best bet is to stop all these despicable ('dethshpikable' in Daffy accent)ethnic prejudice and move forward! Have you ever observed how unique and unbeatable Naija's can be when John Nwachukwu, Essien Uduak, Kayode Falana, Ali Kafanchan and Omorodion join hands together and actually work as Nigerians? Oh it sure feels good...it feels so good you'd think your spirit'd sail into the worlds beyond the perceptive capacity of the human eyes. grinning:
Another one with rose tinted glasses, I see.

Isn't it fascinating how they now want the unity of Nigeria when they are hugely benefiting from bieng part of the entity? Now, they are raking in foreign currency and suddenly its the Nigeria we hail thee song?

What happens if the monopoly power shifts to the South again? What song will they be singing then? Oh Biafra my home?

Nigeria has no business being together! The colonial era is gone! Awolowo is dead, Azikwe is gone, Tafawa Balewa don kpeme! There is no Nigeria!

To each his own. I am a Yoruba woman!
 
By the way, the revenue isn't benefitting Nigeria as a whole but a particular ethnic group which is Igbo!

Not only are the casts igbo, the people behind the camera are Igbo too! Tell me how this is Nigeria's success?

The most annoying part is not only do they keep other ethnic groups off, they come to our land, and take up our areas too! Even Tunde Kelani cannot market an English movie in Idumota! Maybe it's time they rename Idumota, Nwanchukwu or Nwabara? Pshew!
 

grafikdon

Well-Known Member
Another one with rose tinted glasses, I see.

Isn't it fascinating how they now want the unity of Nigeria when they are hugely benefiting from bieng part of the entity? Now, they are raking in foreign currency and suddenly its the Nigeria we hail thee song?

What happens if the monopoly power shifts to the South again? What song will they be singing then? Oh Biafra my home?

Nigeria has no business being together! The colonial era is gone! Awolowo is dead, Azikwe is gone, Tafawa Balewa don kpeme! There is no Nigeria!

To each his own. I am a Yoruba woman!
:confused: Ummm... Nigeria we hail thee... that was complete sarcasm but unfortunately you couldn't fathom that given that you walk around with a tribe sniffing radar... you see tribe in everything... some of us don't, take it or leave it...at the rate you're going, I am sure you know what a Yoruba, Igbo, Efik and Urhobo farts smell like...sweat:

Peaches, there's no gain in that path you have chosen, look within you and you will discover the joy of tolerance and respect for anything that is different. It is NOT difficult, some of us do that successfully without prejudice. Finally , it really won't do you any good reading unnecessary meanings into people's posts...the unending misrepresentation and misinterpretation isn't really looking good, especially when it is a sharp contrast to both the face value of the statement and the intention of the poster. You also need to travel more or at least ask questions because some of your comments look like those of an American who spends all his time in Brooklyn, New York and probably traveled to only two ''countries'' namely; Florida and New jersey and then beats his chest proclaiming at the top of his voice..."We have the best buffet in the whole world". I hope this is just your online personality kicking in...if that is the real you... you gotta slow down, you're too young for this sort of bitterness and malice.
 
:confused: Ummm... Nigeria we hail thee... that was complete sarcasm but unfortunately you couldn't fathom that given that you walk around with a tribe sniffing radar... you see tribe in everything... some of us don't, take it or leave it...at the rate you're going, I am sure you know what a Yoruba, Igbo, Efik and Urhobo farts smell like...sweat:

Peaches, there's no gain in that path you have chosen, look within you and you will discover the joy of tolerance and respect for anything that is different. It is NOT difficult, some of us do that successfully without prejudice. Finally , it really won't do you any good reading unnecessary meanings into people's posts...the unending misrepresentation and misinterpretation isn't really looking good, especially when it is a sharp contrast to both the face value of the statement and the intention of the poster. I hope this is just your online personality kicking in...if that is the real you... you gotta slow down, you're too young for this sort of bitterness and malice.
I'm feeling the bitterness the Biafrans felt. What is wrong in that?

And yes, I know the consequences of holding such views. I happen not to believe in one Nigeria (some will call it ignorance, others like you call it prejudice, but I call it the truth).
 
:confused: Ummm... Nigeria we hail thee... that was complete sarcasm but unfortunately you couldn't fathom that given that you walk around with a tribe sniffing radar... you see tribe in everything... some of us don't, take it or leave it...at the rate you're going, I am sure you know what a Yoruba, Igbo, Efik and Urhobo farts smell like...sweat:

Peaches, there's no gain in that path you have chosen, look within you and you will discover the joy of tolerance and respect for anything that is different. It is NOT difficult, some of us do that successfully without prejudice. Finally , it really won't do you any good reading unnecessary meanings into people's posts...the unending misrepresentation and misinterpretation isn't really looking good, especially when it is a sharp contrast to both the face value of the statement and the intention of the poster. You also need to travel more or at least ask questions because some of your comments look like those of an American who spends all his time in Brooklyn, New York and probably traveled to only two ''countries'' namely; Florida and New jersey and then beats his chest proclaiming at the top of his voice..."We have the best buffet in the whole world". I hope this is just your online personality kicking in...if that is the real you... you gotta slow down, you're too young for this sort of bitterness and malice.

Sorry, I didn't read your post in it's entirety earlier (I still haven't) but your suggestion of me living more, travelling more (perhpaps to the east, shey?) to ascertain that the south isn't the most accomodating made me laugh.

Okay, maybe i'll travel to your neck of the hood to see just how accomodating to Yoruba people you are. Yes, it's rather silly to conclude that we are the friendliest when i'm yet to visit your town but then again, Lagos is said to be the most diverse state in Naija so there you go.
 
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