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Your Inlaws are visiting....

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#21
A few things always change when you have guests at home so certainly if my in-laws are visiting, we will have to made a few adjustments afterall if my parents were visiting I would do the same. If I cannot afford to take a few day off, I do have a flexible job so I would probably adjust my hours in the morning so I can make them breakfast before I leave and show them how to operate the microwave for the lunch which will already be in the fridge for them. If the visit was a planned visit, we would not have taken on any commitment that would interfere with spending a little time with our parents but those that cannot be avoided, we will just make sure they have something to eat and go take care of our business. I will give them a spare key so they can go out themselves (depending if we live in a city like NY which is easy to navigate) if they don't want to be couped up in the house waiting for us.

As per sleeping arrangements, if we have only one bedroom, I would give them our bedroom out of respect and sleep on the pull out and of course, no hanky-panky in the living room in case mama in-law needs a glass of water in the middle of the night :lol. However, if we have extra rooms, they will get their own and our intimacy will continue as before just without any extreme vocal appreciation :lol.

It is all a matter of how much of your routine you are willing to adjust to accomodate them and whether you have an inflexible job, children etc. You just hope that they will respect themselves too and not think that we will be giving up everything to cater to them hand and foot. This no be Naija, we don't have house help to take care of those little details, abeg.
 

Thickmadam

OHHHHHH YEAHHHHHHHH!!
#22
lmaoooo
that's what my friend said too. that her mother in law was shocked that her son, her FIRST SON, no less, was washing dishes. i asked her how she handled it and she said she didn't.
she just told her husband to let his mum know that this is america and there are no househelps, and that they have set up their household in a way that works for both of them. she said she had to lock herself in the bathroom to laugh at the speed with which the woman rushed to take the dishes away from her son.

I remember the kids dad's mother was shocked when she visited that her son was doing dishes. She asked him "are you washing plate?" LMAO. I was looking around for the hired help we had lying around that would do it for us. She soon got used to seeing him do house work and me not being there till late at night or leaving before she woke up in the morning
Sif-sif is right. for a lot of nigerians it's a big no-no for a woman to call her husband by his name. but a lot of the younger nigerian couples are not subscribing to that. my aunt calls her husband "chief", another calls hers "nnam uku" ...loosely translated it's means big father, or big man, or master.
i absolutely refuse, REFUSE to call my husband anything like that. na crase?
if your name or honey, darling, sweetie doesn't work, then yawa don gas.

@bolded...You mean she isn't supposed to call her husband by her name??
 

Dsampler

Well-Known Member
#23
A few things always change when you have guests at home so certainly if my in-laws are visiting, we will have to made a few adjustments afterall if my parents were visiting I would do the same. If I cannot afford to take a few day off, I do have a flexible job so I would probably adjust my hours in the morning so I can make them breakfast before I leave and show them how to operate the microwave for the lunch which will already be in the fridge for them. If the visit was a planned visit, we would not have taken on any commitment that would interfere with spending a little time with our parents but those that cannot be avoided, we will just make sure they have something to eat and go take care of our business. I will give them a spare key so they can go out themselves (depending if we live in a city like NY which is easy to navigate) if they don't want to be couped up in the house waiting for us.

As per sleeping arrangements, if we have only one bedroom, I would give them our bedroom out of respect and sleep on the pull out and of course, no hanky-panky in the living room in case mama in-law needs a glass of water in the middle of the night :lol. However, if we have extra rooms, they will get their own and our intimacy will continue as before just without any extreme vocal appreciation :lol.

It is all a matter of how much of your routine you are willing to adjust to accomodate them and whether you have an inflexible job, children etc. You just hope that they will respect themselves too and not think that we will be giving up everything to cater to them hand and foot. This no be Naija, we don't have house help to take care of those little details, abeg.
Pretense, pretense. True color go show one day.
 

Pete

Well-Known Member
#26
The passive nature of most modern day cultures will always challenge old traditions. Put things in perspective, if the pattern was to remain consistent (that is, the ever-evolving shift from established traditions) as it is, would you be willing to accept your kid's style/way of life even if it highly contrasts what you practice? Or should it always come down to whatever makes them happy?
 

paj

Well-Known Member
#28
...thanks to my very understanding wife she agreed that I could add an additional wife when I turn 75...smokin: and God forbid if @ 75 I go gree some 21 year old chick just "slam name for my head" simply because of Luff in Tokyo :gnash
 

Abike

Well-Known Member
#29
Come again?

The passive nature of most modern day cultures will always challenge old traditions. Put things in perspective, if the pattern was to remain consistent (that is, the ever-evolving shift from established traditions) as it is, would you be willing to accept your kid's style/way of life even if it highly contrasts what you practice? Or should it always come down to whatever makes them happy?
 

Field Marshal

ABSOLUTE SUPREME RULER
#30
lmaoooo
that's what my friend said too. that her mother in law was shocked that her son, her FIRST SON, no less, was washing dishes. i asked her how she handled it and she said she didn't.
she just told her husband to let his mum know that this is america and there are no househelps, and that they have set up their household in a way that works for both of them. she said she had to lock herself in the bathroom to laugh at the speed with which the woman rushed to take the dishes away from her son.



Sif-sif is right. for a lot of nigerians it's a big no-no for a woman to call her husband by his name. but a lot of the younger nigerian couples are not subscribing to that. my aunt calls her husband "chief", another calls hers "nnam uku" ...loosely translated it's means big father, or big man, or master.
i absolutely refuse, REFUSE to call my husband anything like that. na crase?
if your name or honey, darling, sweetie doesn't work, then yawa don gas.
:confused: .............so wai u dey call me Big Daddy wen i dey enta u nah? :confused:
 

Sifu

Well-Known Member
#32
lmaoooo
that's what my friend said too. that her mother in law was shocked that her son, her FIRST SON, no less, was washing dishes. i asked her how she handled it and she said she didn't.
she just told her husband to let his mum know that this is america and there are no househelps, and that they have set up their household in a way that works for both of them. she said she had to lock herself in the bathroom to laugh at the speed with which the woman rushed to take the dishes away from her son.



Sif-sif is right. for a lot of nigerians it's a big no-no for a woman to call her husband by his name. but a lot of the younger nigerian couples are not subscribing to that. my aunt calls her husband "chief", another calls hers "nnam uku" ...loosely translated it's means big father, or big man, or master.
i absolutely refuse, REFUSE to call my husband anything like that. na crase?
if your name or honey, darling, sweetie doesn't work, then yawa don gas.
Same thing here. She started doing dishes after that. LOL
 

kolinzo

Well-Known Member
#37
The passive nature of most modern day cultures will always challenge old traditions. Put things in perspective, if the pattern was to remain consistent (that is, the ever-evolving shift from established traditions) as it is, would you be willing to accept your kid's style/way of life even if it highly contrasts what you practice? Or should it always come down to whatever makes them happy?
E kpom nwokem!! You are a true son of the soil.grinning:
 

paj

Well-Known Member
#39
I remember the kids dad's mother was shocked when she visited that her son was doing dishes. She asked him "are you washing plate?" LMAO. I was looking around for the hired help we had lying around that would do it for us. She soon got used to seeing him do house work and me not being there till late at night or leaving before she woke up in the morning
..wait O!!:gnash...na who chop finish wey the husband dey wash dishes?:gnash was he doing his own dishes abi all of dem chop finish then na the husband come dey wash dishes?:gnash I wait for ya answer before I get even more pissed :gnash
 
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