• Naija Rules! has been around since 2003, providing a hangout for the fans of Nigerian and African movies. Our members were in the forefront of the spread of movies from Africa to the world.

A white man's opinion

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Sola

Administrator
Staff member
Just read this online:
A few weeks ago, someone posted information about obtaining African movies from this website.... I don't recall the individual's name but I would like to thank him very much for this information. I have purchased 3 videotapes from this company in Brooklyn, New York. I have also had the added benefit of discussing them with a co-worker who is a Yoruba from Nigeria who has also seen the same movies.

One of the movies that I saw was called THE PRICE. It has a religious theme about a minister who is lied upon by one of his church members. The church council then fires him based upon the word of one member. I recommend this movie for all church folks.

I am also particularly excited about these movies because they allow for a cultural exhange between us and Nigerians. As you are well aware, the American media is very hostile towards Africa. We hear about the cataclysmic events, internal revolutions, famines, and other disasters all the time from CBS, NBS, and ABC. I have often wondered what do Nigerians, Ethiopians, South Africans, Ghanians, and the other citizens of African countries do when they are not involved in these events. Alas!!!, I get to see life in this particular country of Nigeria as seen by Nigerians. It's a blessing to see an African movie produced by Africans and to get a glimpse of Nigerian culture from their point of view.

It's actually a culture shock to me to see a city which is totally Black. Everything that is done in the city whether it be construction of the skyscrapers or running the banking system is done by all Black people. All of the businesses are operated by Black folks!!!! It also gives you a glimpse into the houses of Nigerian. Now, I am a realist, I know that the average Nigerian does not drive a Mercedes or live in a house which looks like a palace but when those guys get money, they spare no expense.

Once again, I would like to thank that individual who posted this information. Some of these religious tapes would be a great teaching tool.


Jazzman
 

miZZpaWPaw

Member
interesting.....tha black folks part threw me off kinda made me laugh afterwards
but...Nice to know he enjoyed the movie enough to write this essay:)
 

vince

Well-Known Member
The fact that we are able to tell our own stories is what makes nollywood so attractive to some of these whites.They really believe that they do not really know africans and what they are seeing on their screens can't be acccurate,at least some of them think this way.
I know a lot of them here in austria.
 

Videoscope

Naija Movie Critic
I think it's for reasons like this that NIgerian moviemakers should be careful what kind of movies they make. For some people, this will be the only window into our country, just like American movies were at a time the only windows so many Nigerians had into American society. Even now some Nigerians still believe everything they see in American movies, thus contributing to the myth that America is a land flowing with milk and honey where you don't have to work. It's nice to have this guy saying such good things about our movies. I think the difference btw this person and Nick Nolan ( remember him?) is that Jazzman came with an open mind while our friend from the BBC came expecting Hollywood.
 

brandi

Well-Known Member
It's all good if it took our movies for him to see that people in Africa lead normal lives. He is def on point with the cultural exchange, but the dude had to be ignorant and inconscious talking about black people building their own houses. duh
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
Originally posted by brandi
It's all good if it took our movies for him to see that people in Africa lead normal lives. He is def on point with the cultural exchange, but the dude had to be ignorant and inconscious talking about black people building their own houses. duh
Believe me, that's the majority in this parts. I can't even begin to tell you the questions I've been asked (do you have houses?).
 

Gen Sani Abacha

Well-Known Member
Heck folks, don't even talk about the white people. When I first came to the UK, there were several black-brits/carribeans asking if Africa was "one big village". :eek:

Another asked me if Sierra Leone was a "Nigerian Country". :eek:

Yet another was surprised to learn about the seasonal nature of African clothes ( ie seasonal style/material changes. That we had our own designers etc).

Then there was the Pakistani asking wether or not we had our own music ? duh-uh.

Some people think only African-Americans and Carribeans are "civilised", they don't really reckon with us continental Africans, well its their head ache not mine. Its too much wahala trying to disabuse some peoples minds. Let them stew in their ignorance I say. :mad:


ciao
 

toyin

Active Member
Coming back to the UK from naija, the cab driver asked me whwere my plane landed when i got to naija. For a minute, i didn't get it......he thot we don't even have an airport. I sarcastically said it dropped us thru parachutes.

The sad thing is, he wasn't even joking!:mad:
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
Originally posted by toyin
Coming back to the UK from naija, the cab driver asked me whwere my plane landed when i got to naija. For a minute, i didn't get it......he thot we don't even have an airport. I sarcastically said it dropped us thru parachutes.
Toyin! Toyin! Toyin! How many times I call ya name? Abeg no take laughter kill me o! :D
 

vince

Well-Known Member
Originally posted by toyin
Coming back to the UK from naija, the cab driver asked me whwere my plane landed when i got to naija. For a minute, i didn't get it......he thot we don't even have an airport. I sarcastically said it dropped us thru parachutes.

The sad thing is, he wasn't even joking!:mad:
:roll
 

toyin

Active Member
Dat na how my 7yr old pickin with extra large mouth go tell her class say na inside hut with thatched roof wey naijas dey live. When i go pick am up, na so i dey get sympathetic looks from other parents. Walahi, i no dey paranoid o. This was a few days after o. Later, she come tell me. I say why you tell them that now? she say, na becos when we dey watch yoruba movie for house, the people dey live inside hut!!! see me see trouble:D
 
P

Panasoul

Guest
embarrased

Hi,

I am new to this board and since I am also a new fan of nigerian movies, this thread seemed like a good point to start.

I can understand you found jazzmans remark embarassing. I did, too.
I come from Germany, though, and here also only few white people (like me) do know anything about nollywood (they still are surprised and delighted that there is something like indian bollywood).
Its true that in the media here also, you do not see anything about normal life in africa or (contemporary!) culture there.

Luckily, where I live, there are some shops where one can obtain these movies. I was interested in them at the start first because I am interested in african culture and second because I am interested in movie culture different from hollywood.

I recently watched "The grandfathers" and I liked it. Also watched "king and the crown" .

Still I have to agree, this for me also is like a window into another culture (even though I knew there are big cities in nigeria, and who lives there :) )
Do they represent life in nigeria like hollywood represents life in america, sometimes somehow unrealistic?

But I think the way of story-telling is different from european or american movies I know. Also, there are sometimes things you do not really understand without knowing nigerian culture - like rules of society, or myths that are referred to.

There are often very long scenes, and the movies I have seen have a somehow slow, relaxed pace, compared to hollywood movies. Reminds me a little bit of older european movies, or tv-series.


I am also interested in the fact that most of the movies are filmed on video, because I study film and this is an approach I also use - because it is cheaper and less complicated for me.

I noticed the copy-warning at the beginning - is this a big problem?

Are video-cd-players common in nigeria?

Any recommendations for me what I should watch next?

And, what I am really curious about: Are there things like nigerian science-fiction movies?
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
Re: embarrased

Originally posted by Panasoul
Still I have to agree, this for me also is like a window into another culture (even though I knew there are big cities in nigeria, and who lives there :) )

Do they represent life in nigeria like hollywood represents life in america, sometimes somehow unrealistic?
They do represent life in Nigeria, but are sometimes merely dramatic and unrealistic. Our concerns are different.

Originally posted by Panasoul
But I think the way of story-telling is different from european or american movies I know. Also, there are sometimes things you do not really understand without knowing nigerian culture - like rules of society, or myths that are referred to.
Our culture and condition makes room for a lot of melodrama, and so our storytelling is soap-operaish. In addition, we lack the cash and skills required to produce fast paced adrenaline charged Hollywood pieces, so we settle for the wordy dramatic stuff - the type you will see on Lifetime channel here in the US. As for the cultural elements that may appear confusing, it is the same in Hollywood or Bollywood. I have lived here in the US 7 years now, but therr are still things about American culture that I will never understand.

Originally posted by Panasoul There are often very long scenes, and the movies I have seen have a somehow slow, relaxed pace, compared to hollywood movies. Reminds me a little bit of older european movies, or tv-series.[/B]
What we call movies are more like TV shows elsewhere. The long scenes are more of laziness on the part of the writer and director. Things that can be visually displayed are explained because of budget/time limitations or just plain lack of imagination. Largely teething problems though...

Originally posted by Panasoul I am also interested in the fact that most of the movies are filmed on video, because I study film and this is an approach I also use - because it is cheaper and less complicated for me.[/B]
Budget limitations again. It also hastens the quick release of the movie. Besides, we don't have theatres to screen celluloid films.

Originally posted by Panasoul I noticed the copy-warning at the beginning - is this a big problem?[/B]
Yap

Originally posted by Panasoul Are video-cd-players common in nigeria?[/B]
Yap

Originally posted by Panasoul Any recommendations for me what I should watch next?[/B]
Any movie by Tunde Kelani, Tade Ogidan, Tchidi Chikere, Amaka Igwe... In that order.

Originally posted by Panasoul And, what I am really curious about: Are there things like nigerian science-fiction movies? [/B]
Not as a genre, although someone did an experimental thing a while ago. It sold nada as the market didn't get it.

Welcome to Naija Rules!
 
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