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Hollywood Black America

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vince

Well-Known Member
Should it move closer to nigeria/africa,so that more co-productions can be made?I think both sides will benefit.What do y'all think?
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
We need to move up in terms if quality first. Right now, it will be difficult for them to think we are a force to be reckoned with.

All those stories in American dailies will help though. We have to be careful foreigners don't come with more money to hijack the industry. This is where policy will protect the local amrket and make it tougher for foriegners to grab it.
 

vince

Well-Known Member
Originally posted by Sola
We need to move up in terms if quality first. Right now, it will be difficult for them to think we are a force to be reckoned with.

All those stories in American dailies will help though. We have to be careful foreigners don't come with more money to hijack the industry. This is where policy will protect the local amrket and make it tougher for foriegners to grab it.

I don't think it is necessary to wait for our quality level to come up to par with them before they come in.Their coming in will automatically pull the quality up.It will bring in more needed cash which in turn will drive up the production quality.
I don't even mean,they coming in,at least not outright.Just co-productions.Nigerian/black american stories or afro/black american stories with main characters from both side of the atlantic.That could be a start.We have the audience for this.Hundreds of millions waiting for such a thing.So there is no problem of getting ready-made viewers.
I don't think that black american moviemakers are getting good enough deal in a white dominated hollywood and where the majority of viewers are white.
If they look towards africa and nigeria,they will see that the situation is totally different.
I don't think that there is any danger of them taking over the industry.It is all about working side by side with it and enhancing it's qualities significantly.I really believe that there should be cooperations here.
 

TVwriter23

Active Member
I think that would be a good idea. I was inspired by the Nigerian Video Industry, Bollywood, HK Cinema etc. and came up with an idea for a video and theatrical one. I'm still working on the idea, but I have another one I think could work. I think that we should start a black owned video industry everywhere. Like maybe those in the Nigerian Video Industry could find a way to help others get their own started or get filmmakers here to go there or something to work within the industry see how it's done, go back home and do theirs. Or As the other idea I mentioned earlier is have a production company sign on actors, writers etc. somewhat like the old studios have done. The actors are required to get more training in acting, writing, etc. with the money they make. After a certain amount of time they then go out and make start their own production companies, make their own movies, sign up talent and do the process all over again that way it grows.

Since here in America African American we don't have that many outlets for our movies. I think we need to consider the video or tv industry.

Jamacians are having trouble with a movie industry http://www.eye.net/eye/issue/issue_04.13.00/film/thirdworldcop.html ,

black Canadians
http://www.griots.net/archives/focus/bcfilm.html http://pirg.uwaterloo.ca/icedinblack/index.html
http://www.yorku.ca/aconline/film.html
http://www.fadetoblackinc.ca/summary.htm

black British,
http://www.itpmag.demon.co.uk/Black British Cinema.html
http://www.blackfilmmakermag.com/festival2k3/newbfmpress1.html

African American,
check this book out Oscar Micheaux and His Circle: African-American Filmmaking and Race Cinema of the Silent Era
Pearl Bowser

Check this or any other book or site on Race Films or Separate Cinema Oscar Micheaux etc. this happened in the early 1900's to around the 1940's-50's era then of course the blaxploitation movement of the 70's or the black film movement of the 70's.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/opinion/columnists/wickham/wick150.htm
http://www.rkacinemasociety.com/
http://www.blackflix.com/
http://www.bherc.org/
http://www.sistersincinema.com/
http://www.brightlightsfilm.com/36/distribution1.html
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Black-Filmmakers/
http://www.dvrepublic.com/
http://www.surfview.com/seresbff.htm
http://www.hbff.org
http://www.abff.com/
http://www.abff.com/
http://www.blackfilm.com/
http://www.blackflixx.com/
http://indieblackfilm.com/
http://www.blackcinemacafe.com/
http://www.nmstudios.com/
http://www.micheauxfoundation.com
http://www.shorock.com/arts/micheaux/ (was really cool dude)
http://www.msoyonline.com/centerStage/Om.htm
http://www.blackfilmmakers.net/



I can give you so many black american filmmaking sites movie sites, production companies it's sad, but we still have a hard time getting out there etc. Sometimes I think we rely to much on getting it in the theaters. by going the video route you get an audience, but not only that you also get to see what the audiences like as well, so that when you do get to the theater you have a variety and not just one type of genres.


German etc.
Personally I think video right now is the best start for us. Then move to theatrical. But first we need to find or make a market.

My ultimate goal is a panafrican video/film industry.

What do you think?

here is a filmmaking site for a black filmmaking magazine
http://www.blackfilmmakermag.com/

You know what writing this reply inspired me to keep up with my idea.
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
SOunds good, TVwriter23. And certainly achievable. I have always liked the concept of mentoring.

We do have that right now, just not in the formal sense. It actually started in the 30s/40s with Hubert Ogunde and his Alarinjo crowd. He was the leader and teacher. This is how the yoruba traveling theatre grew so big.

In recent times, newbies still hook up to available stars... If you read the Interview with Zack Orji, you will see that our producers are already working with people in Ghana, Congo, Sierra Leone, South Africa and so many other places to further evolve this growing video industry, to make it a style that is wholly African, at home and in the Diaspora.
 

TVwriter23

Active Member
I think that would be a good idea for people to work with Tunde. The dude's pretty big and makes quality movies.
 

TVwriter23

Active Member
In recent times, newbies still hook up to available stars... If you read the Interview with Zack Orji, you will see that our producers are already working with people in Ghana, Congo, Sierra Leone, South Africa and so many other places to further evolve this growing video industry, to make it a style that is wholly African, at home and in the Diaspora.

That's cool, and later when they get established maybe it will become more of a panafrican industry. Somewhat like Hollywood wood is pan U. S. or Bollywood well somewhat , HK cinema. The more an industry is together the bigger it is. Plus Hollywood needs more competition. The more the better.
 

Sola

Administrator
Staff member
The African Film Festival is slated to do a restrospective on Tunde Kelani next year. TK is now working on some movies for the event. The current one he's on location shooting, he went to a Nigerian university (Unilag) to cast it. He also picked a lot of productiions hands there, all in the process of having them see him doing it, so they can know it is not as easy to get quality out.

Zeb Ejiro's office is always full of people who want to help in any capacity, just to get the leg in. In the process, they learn. It works like that all over the country. For marketers, producers, directors...
 

zgirl

Member
Infact....... I am really short of words. Maybe I should sit back and pray for this to work out cos to me it sounds like day dreaming and with faith will work out.
 

Abulu2000

Member
T.V.writer, The day of the pan-African distributor has arrived. Courtesy of the Nigerian film industry and Filmmakers Association of Nigeria, U.S.A. (FAN). All independent Pan-African filmmakers works will be distributed via the Nigerian video market route in the U.S. and Canada. To learn more, check out the Tony Abulu interview in Naijarules.com
 

vince

Well-Known Member
TVWriter23 is MIA at the moment.
Haven't seen her online this year.
Hope she is in good health sha.
 
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